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YouTubers should appear natural and say “sorry” four times in apology videos

From Zoella to James Charles, many of the world’s most famous YouTubers have posted videos to apologize for past or present behaviors.

These apologetic videos attract a lot of attention and can get millions of views.

For example, Logan Paul’s video of apologizing for his insensitivity to a dead person has been viewed 61 million times since 2018, and Elle Darby’s video of apologizing for the racist tweets she wrote as a teenager has been viewed 1.2 million times in just six months.

Now, scientists at Columbia College in Chicago have outlined the most effective strategies to use when making these videos, known as ‘YouTuber’s apology videos’.

Their findings suggest that forgiving youtubers should appear natural and apologize four times, while helping if you have a lot of subscribers.

The apology videos attract a lot of attention, as Logan Paul’s apology video has garnered more than 61 million views about his insensitivity to a dead person.

The art of forgiveness video

– Portrait yourself naturally, without make-up and wearing natural clothes

– Commitment to improving yourself

– Focus on mortification

– Do not use denial

– Sorry four times, and at least once every three minutes

YouTube’s apology videos have risen in popularity in recent years, including PewDiePie’s ‘My Response’, which apologized for using the N-word in a live stream, and Logan Paul’s ‘So Sorry’, which apologizes for recording a dead man hanging yours. In the ‘forest of suicides’ in Japan.

However, the impact of YouTube’s apology videos has not been investigated so far.

“Many YouTube professionals and amateurs are apologizing for past and present behaviors, which created a new genre of media called YouTube apology video,” the group led by Grace Choik wrote in her research, published in the journal Public Relations Review.

“Although these videos are overflowing, their impact is still questionable in understanding the magnitude of this online apology.”

In their study, the researchers looked at the construction, strategies, honesty, and forgiveness of YouTube’s video apology messages.

The team reviewed the content of 117 videos, including video length, views, comments, production level, appearance, and message.

Elle Darby’s apologetic video of her racist tweets she wrote as a teenager has been viewed 1.2 million times in six months.

Elle Darby’s apologetic video of her racist tweets she wrote as a teenager has been viewed 1.2 million times in six months.

In their study, the researchers looked at the construction, strategies, honesty, and forgiveness of YouTube’s video apology messages. Pictured: PewDiePie's apology video after saying the word n ​​in a live broadcast

In their study, the researchers looked at the construction, strategies, honesty, and forgiveness of YouTube’s video apology messages. Pictured: PewDiePie’s apology video after saying the word n ​​in a live broadcast

Their analysis revealed that most of the YouTubers who posted apologetic videos were white men, and most were without “home clothes” and makeup.

“Although these videos were depicted in a natural look, most of the videos, using a natural light source and no music, included digital editing and additional self-promotion, while YouTube controlled the apology message,” the researchers wrote.

The most popular theme in the videos was the “content problem,” and 40 percent promised to improve themselves.

In terms of repair strategies, the most common method was mortification (70%), while 24% of the videos were viewed as negative.

“Given that these are YouTubers who are under the spotlight of life and can easily follow them on social media, it makes sense to deny that they are not a beneficial strategy when used against social media,” the researchers explained.

As for major apologies, YouTube in particular said “sorry” for the average three-minute mark, and four times per video.

Unfortunately, for the smaller creators, it seems like the audience is more forgiving if they are subscribed.

“Our findings suggest that previous connections with YouTube increased audience forgiveness, and that perceived honesty was a harbinger of forgiveness,” the researchers wrote.

The team hopes the findings will be useful to both YouTube and viewers.

“Analyzing these videos through content and media effects will help professionals, scholars, viewers, and content creators to critically reflect on these videos and assess the impact of YouTube on crisis communication,” they concluded.

YouTube founder Jawed Karim has condemned the decision to remove the dislike of the platform

Jawed Karim, one of YouTube’s three founders, has denounced the platform’s decision to remove accounts it dislikes from videos, saying YouTube will turn “everything is mediocre” into a place and lead to its downfall.

YouTube’s decision earlier this month hides the number of times other users have clicked the ‘thumb down’ icon below the videos to express grief.

YouTube said the changes would prevent groups of malicious YouTube users from deliberately chasing other users, increasing the number of dislikes in their videos, which they called “coordinated disliked attacks.”

But according to Karim, the ability to easily and quickly identify bad content is an “essential feature” on YouTube, and removing it can lead to a decline in the website.

Karim expressed his displeasure by editing the description of the first video uploaded to YouTube – ‘Me at the zoo’ – starring him as a 25-year-old.

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YouTubers should appear natural and say “sorry” four times in apology videos

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