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Vote to remove Capitol from Capitol

The US House of Representatives resolved on Tuesday to pass a bill to remove Capitol statues from the Capitol, as well as statues of individuals who perpetuated racism and white supremacy.


What you need to know

  • The US House of Representatives resolved to pass the HR3005 on Tuesday night. This is a bill to remove Confederate statues from the Capitol grounds.
  • The final vote was 285-120. 67 Republicans joined all House Democrats in attendance and voted in favor of the bill.
  • The law specifically called for the replacement of the bust of Roger B. Tanny of the former Supreme Court with the bust of Thurgood Marshall.
  • Parliamentary architects are instructed to identify other statues depicting people who served to be removed from public in the Confederate States of America.

The final vote was 285-120. 67 Republicans joined all House Democrats in attendance and voted in favor of the bill. The bill is now heading to the Senate, where 10 Republicans will need to join all 50 Democrats to pass the bill.

Introduced in May of this year by Democratic Party Leader Stennie Heuer, the leader of the House of Representatives, the HR3005 specifically called for the replacement of the bust of former Supreme Court Roger B. Tanny with the bust of Sir Good Marshall.

Judge Roger B. Tanny wrote a number of opinions on the Dred Sam Scott v. Sandford case in 1857, proclaiming that the previously enslaved black man was not a U.S. citizen and therefore did not run for federal court. did.

“This sacred space, this democratic temple, has been polluted for too long. We must not forget history. We must learn from history,” Hoyer said before voting. Said on the floor. “But we shouldn’t respect what we … defile the principles we stand on.”

“It’s time to remove the symbols of slavery, racism and sedition from these halls,” he added.

The decision was later revoked by amendments to Articles 13 and 14.

“This decision represents a dark chapter in racism, slavery and sedition in the history of our country,” Hoyer said in a statement introducing the law about Dred Scott. .. “Judge Tanny’s decision is the exact opposite of everything our country represents, and his bust should not continue to hold a place of honor in the Capitol building.”

Instead, Heuer proposed replacing the bust of Thurgood Marshall, a civil rights defender and the first black Supreme Court judge in US history, with Tanny’s bust.

“It’s never too late to do the right thing. This law works to correct historical mistakes, ensuring that the Capitol reflects the principles and ideals of an American position. I will do it, “Heuer wrote.

The bill specified three additional statues to be removed from the Capitol without identifying other alternative icon graphs.

They include the statue of Charles Brantley Acock in North Carolina, the state’s 50th Governor, and an avid supporter of white supremacism. Statue of John Coldwell Calhoun, South Carolina. He is the seventh Vice President in the United States and an advocate of slavery. A statue of James Paul Clarke, a former governor of Arkansas and an advocate of white supremacism.

North Carolina lawmakers have already worked separately to replace the statue of Charles Brantley with the statue of Rev. Billy Graham. But the process is painfully slow.

In the long run, Capitol architects will be instructed to identify other statues depicting people removed from public in the Confederate States of America.

As of the end of last year, there were still at least 11 Confederate monuments standing in the Capitol.

Under federal law, each state can choose between two statues or busts to stand in the National Statuary Hall collection at Capitol Hill.

The removed statue will return to its original state.

Jefferson Davis, a former US Senator in Mississippi who was President of the Confederate States of America, is represented by one of two statues in that state. For example, the statue of Davis will be returned to Mississippi, and the statue of Alexander Hamilton Stevens will be returned to Georgia.

Ultimately, it’s up to the state to decide which historical figures to display.

Heuer introduced a similar law last summer, and the House of Representatives voted 305-113 in favor of the bill, but the Republican-controlled Senate took no action. Democrats hope that equal division in the Senate will give them a better chance of passing this year’s version.

“We can’t change history, but our respect and non-respect for the symbols of slavery, incitement, and racism do make clear that there is no place in the Senate hall. You can, “Heuer told reporters on Tuesday, he was Senator Chuck Schumer, Senator DN.Y. He added that he hopes to pick up the bill in the near future.

Vote to remove Capitol from Capitol

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