Texas

Vintage photos show the Alamo over 140 years ago

San Antonio – The Alamo is the mission of the former Franciscans in the heart of downtown San Antonio and is one of Texas’ most famous buildings. But have you seen it as far back as 140 years ago?

Construction began in 1718 with a famous mission known as the San Antonio de Valero mission, which was converted into a fort in 1803.

The earliest known photographs of the Alamo are actually the Daguerreotype, the first publicly available photographic process. Taken in 1849, it shows three men standing outside the landmark.

Photos from a special digital collection at the University of Texas at San Antonio are one of the oldest photographs dating back to the 1870s, showing Alamo’s photographs throughout history.

Created for stereographs, this unmounted print shows a view facing northeast towards Alamo. The date of the photo is about. 1872-1877. (Mary Angela and Wandita Ford Turner)

The photo below was taken from Drace’s Alamo drugstore in Alamo Plaza, California, according to the description on the UTSA digital collection site. 1882.

The photo shows Alamo Plaza with a meat market in the foreground. Alamo Chapel and Glenette Building in the background. Look northeast. Ca. 1882.
The photo shows Alamo Plaza with a meat market in the foreground. Alamo Chapel and Glenette Building in the background. Look northeast. Ca. 1882. (UTSA Special Collection)

The photo below shows the interior of the Alamo with the inscription “Interior Alamo”. It was built in 1738. San Antonio, Texas. “

The photo shows the interior of the Alamo Chapel with a view of the frame roof. Photo ca. 1900.
The photo shows the interior of the Alamo Chapel with a view of the frame roof. Photo ca. 1900. (UTSA Special Collection)

A Japanese monument donated by Professor Shiga Shigetaka from Tokyo is shown below the 1914 photo. The monument is dedicated to the “Hero of the Alamo” who has been on duty for 13 days from the Spanish army led by Santa Ana. According to History.com, the “Battle of the Alamo” later became a battle cry during the Mexican-American War.

The photo shows a stone monument dedicated to the heroes of the Alamo, donated by Professor Shiga Shigetaka from Tokyo and placed in the courtyard of the Alamo Monastery in 1914.
The photo shows a stone monument dedicated to the heroes of the Alamo, donated by Professor Shiga Shigetaka from Tokyo and placed in the courtyard of the Alamo Monastery in 1914. (UTSA Special Collection)
The photo shows the Alamo Chapel as seen from the doorway on the north side of the building. Prickly pear cactus growing on the Alamo parapet.Photo ca. 1927
The photo shows the Alamo Chapel as seen from the doorway on the north side of the building. Prickly pear cactus growing on the Alamo parapet.Photo ca. 1927 (Unrassel)

Some photos show not only the old mission, but the surrounding area. Below is a picture of Alamo and Alamo Plaza. 1935. In addition to pedestrians in the distance, you can see all the palm trees and old cars.

The photo is a view facing northwest from the Menger Hotel. The building, from left to right, includes the Crockett Block, Palace Theater and Woolworths (all on Alamo Street). Gibbsville; and the post office.Photo ca. 1935
The photo is a view facing northwest from the Menger Hotel. The building, from left to right, includes the Crockett Block, Palace Theater and Woolworths (all on Alamo Street). Gibbsville; and the post office.Photo ca. 1935 (General photo book)

The Alamo and the Cenotaph monument to the Alamo, commemorating the Battle of the Alamo, can be seen in the photo below, probably taken around 1940.

The photo shows a bird's-eye view facing southeast towards Alamo, the Alamo Museum and Gift Shop (left), and Alamo Plaza's Senotaf (right).
The photo shows a bird’s-eye view facing southeast towards Alamo, the Alamo Museum and Gift Shop (left), and Alamo Plaza’s Senotaf (right). (UTSA Special Collection)

The Texas History Commission has blocked a controversial plan to move The Cenotaph in September 2020. The Commission denied permission for the city of San Antonio to restore the monument and move it hundreds of feet south of the historic footprints of the mission’s courtyard. present location. Please check this out for details.

Copyright 2021-KSAT All rights reserved.

Vintage photos show the Alamo over 140 years ago

Source link Vintage photos show the Alamo over 140 years ago

Back to top button