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Veterans Affairs employees were banned from recording patients after tweeting preoperative notes on penile implant surgery

Veterans Affairs employees are banned from accessing patient records after tweeting preoperative notes on a 72-year-old veterinarian’s penile implant surgery

  • An employee of the DC VA Medical Center, believed to be Carrie Christian, is investigating after tweeting a photo of the patient’s pre-surgery memo.
  • In a deleted tweet, Christian wrote, “A 72-year-old man undergoes government-funded surgery,” including an eggplant emoji.
  • The Department of Veterans Affairs has banned Christians from accessing patient records and is investigating cases that may be considered a violation of HIPAA Act.
  • It is unknown at this time whether Christians will be dismissed for alleged crimes


Employees of the Veterans Hospital were banned from accessing patient records after being accused of tweeting the patient’s preoperative notes prior to surgery.

In the deleted tweet, former Twitter user Carrie Christian allegedly shared a photo of the patient’s preoperative anesthesia memo for penile implant surgery.

’72[-year-old] Men undergo government-funded surgery, “Christian tweeted Monday with an eggplant emoji.

Veterans Affairs spokesman Terence Hayes sent a tweet to the Washington Post on Thursday by the director of the anesthesia department at the DCVA Medical Center, which was banned from accessing patient records, without specifically appointing Christians. I confirmed that.

He also confirmed that the department had begun investigating the case.

‘VA is aware of the incident and takes it very much [seriously]”Haze said.

“Investigation is underway and employees have been removed from all access to veterans’ medical records for the time being.”

Veterans spokesman Terence Hayes confirmed that the person responsible for the above tweet was banned from accessing patient records.He also confirmed that the department had begun investigating the case.

Carrie Christian (pictured) has been accused of tweeting a patient's preoperative notes before surgery. NS

Carrie Christian (pictured) has been accused of tweeting a patient’s preoperative notes before surgery. Employees of DC VA Medical Center allegedly shared photos of patients’ preoperative anesthesia notes for penile implant surgery

According to Hayes, the photo in the tweet was “a record of a veteran who had surgery last week.”

The photo did not include the patient’s name, but included personal medical information such as veteran heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and mental status.

However, before the Twitter account was deleted, Christians posted a post claiming that the medical records they shared were found on the Internet and not the actual records of VA patients.

MailOnline contacted Christians for comment.

Patient records and personal health information are protected under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and are considered private.

In a privacy VA pamphlet obtained by the newspaper, the ministry argues that employees are trained in HIPAA and must comply with its rules.

“Our employees know that we must be careful not to inadvertently disclose information,” the pamphlet reads.

At this time, it is unclear whether Christians will be dismissed for possible HIPAA violations.

According to the HIPAA Journal, all HIPAA violations are considered “serious problems” and need to be investigated.

However, some violations are more serious than others. Depending on the nature of the incident and your organization’s policies, you may be terminated if you violate HIPAA Act.

What is HIPAA?

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) sets out national standards to protect sensitive patient information from disclosure without the consent and knowledge of the patient. This is the federal law that I created.

The goal of HIPAA is to ensure the protection of personal health information while enabling the flow of health information needed to provide and promote quality medical care and protect the health and well-being of the people.

What information is protected by HIPAA?

  • Information that doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers fill out in your healthcare record
  • Doctors discuss care and treatment with nurses and others
  • Information about you in your health insurance company’s computer system
  • Billing information about you at your clinic
  • Most other health information about you held by people who must comply with these laws

Who needs to follow the HIPAA Act?

  • Health insurance
  • Most healthcare providers
  • Healthcare clearinghouse
  • Contractors, subcontractors, and other outsiders or companies that have access to your medical information: companies that help doctors pay to provide medical care, companies that help manage medical plans, destroy medical records Companies, external lawyers, accountants, and IT specialists

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Veterans Affairs employees were banned from recording patients after tweeting preoperative notes on penile implant surgery

Source link Veterans Affairs employees were banned from recording patients after tweeting preoperative notes on penile implant surgery

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