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U.S. military trained Colonel Guinea behind a recent coup in a West African country

When the Guinean colonel they trained turned out to be the mastermind behind the country’s recent coup, the U.S. military was surprised and is now the leader of the West African country.

According to the New York Times, Colonel Mamadi Dunbowya has led special forces to the presidential palace and declared him the new leader of Guinea after dismissing the country’s 83-year-old president Alpha Condé.

He is said to have fled to start a coup early Sunday, raising such suspicions while his US instructor was asleep.

They have worked with Doumbouya and other Guinean service personnel to train counterterrorism techniques and support civilian government support.

Guinea’s new leaders and their allies are said to have been angry after successfully changing the country’s constitution to allow Conde to serve as president for the third term.

Once a close ally to Conde, Dumbuya is a familiar figure to the U.S. military, who has been with him for many years, staying in the country since July to train a group of about 100 special forces members led by the Colonel.

Colonel Mamadi Dunbowya (pictured) led special forces to the presidential palace and dismissed the country’s 83-year-old President Alpha Conde.

Doumbouya (center) is a familiar figure to the US military, who has helped train 100 special forces members led by the Colonel and has worked with him for many years.

Doumbouya (center) is a familiar figure to the US military, who has helped train 100 special forces members led by the Colonel and has worked with him for many years.

83-year-old President Alpha Conde (pictured), whose popularity in the country has been declining for many years.Testimony was taken

83-year-old President Alpha Conde (pictured), whose popularity in the country has been declining for many years.Testimony was taken

A U.S. African military spokeswoman, Kelly Cahalan, told The Times that the coup “is inconsistent with U.S. military training and education.”

U.S. officials also said they would coup the Times when he got a photo of Dumbouya posing with U.S. military officials outside the U.S. embassy the moment he worked very closely with Americans. He said he was “confused” by his decision.

According to The Times, US officials said they were investigating reports that Doumbouya and his conspirators slipped off the training base at midnight while the instructor was sleeping.

According to The Times, the current situation was “confusing” for the Pentagon due to the close relationship between timing and the colonel.

US authorities even needed to clarify that the United States did not have prior knowledge or involvement in the coup.

A spokeswoman for the United States Africa Command, Balda S. Azari, emailed The Times.

A smiling soldier was caught driving in an enthusiastic crowd

Soldiers were seen touching happy locals

On Sunday, a green beret is recorded driving a four-wheel drive vehicle hanging from behind, with Guinean soldiers smiling and touching locals shouting “freedom.”

People celebrate when Guinean special forces arrive at the Conakry people's palace on Monday

People celebrate when Guinean special forces arrive at the Conakry people’s palace on Monday

People celebrate on the streets with members of the Guinean army after Guinean President Alpha Conde was arrested

People celebrate on the streets with members of the Guinean army after Guinean President Alpha Conde was arrested

Further suspicion of US involvement is a laughing video of American Solder heading to the US Embassy on Sunday.

A group of green berets were recorded driving a four-wheel drive vehicle, with Guinean soldiers hanging from behind, touching locals screaming “freedom” with a smile.

US officials were forced to make it clear that the recorded incident did not reflect any support for the coup.

“The US government and the military have never been involved in this apparent seize of military power,” Azari told The Times.

At the age of 41, Doumbouya, the second youngest leader in the African state, served in Afghanistan and Côte d’Ivoire, and served in the French Foreign Legion after completing a commando training course in Israel. The Times reported.

After the attack on the presidential residence, which killed 11 people last Sunday, the colonel appeared on national flag-covered television and gained power for the actions of President Conde, whose popularity in the country has declined for many years. He insisted that he had to take control.

The Times reported that despite his “dissatisfaction” with President Conde, the Doumbouya coup was most likely caused by tensions, especially with Guinean defense minister Mohammed Diane.

U.S. military trained Colonel Guinea behind a recent coup in a West African country

Source link U.S. military trained Colonel Guinea behind a recent coup in a West African country

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