Texas

The United States has secretly released 35 Russian asylum seekers in the dark on the Mexican border

Nearly three dozen Russian civilians fleeing Moscow after their invasion of Ukraine have been left behind to flee Mexico to the United States, despite the rejection of tens of thousands of other asylum seekers.

35 Russians crossed the border in the dark after reaching an agreement between Mexican and U.S. authorities, Vice reported.

The group was allowed to cross a part of the border that was unlikely to be seen in the first hour of March 20, as Mexico’s immigration offer left the Russian group directly in the hands of U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials.

Asylum seekers Nastya (C), Artem and their son Samuil of Russia are sitting outside the Port of Entry in San Ysidro after leaving the United States on March 21 without crossing into the United States seeking asylum.

U.S. authorities have recently allowed Ukrainian refugees to enter the U.S. on the southern border with permission to remain in the U.S. humanitarian condition for a year.

U.S. authorities have recently allowed Ukrainian refugees to enter the U.S. on the southern border with permission to remain in the U.S. humanitarian condition for a year.

Russian asylum seeker Nastya, Artem and their son Samuil, sitting in a car, sitting outside the Port of San Ysidro, after being denied entry

Russian asylum seeker Nastya, Artem and their son Samuil, sitting in a car, sitting outside the Port of San Ysidro, after being denied entry

The agreement is believed to have been made with the help of U.S. consulate officials in Tijuana and Mexican officials from various levels of government after the Russian displacement camp suddenly began to grow on the streets around the busy Tijuana / San Diego border crossing.

Apparently special treatment circumvented the 42-degree laws imposed on the coronavirus pandemic, which essentially allowed U.S. border officials to refuse asylum applications without hearing cases.

The policy of general refusal, which began in the Trump administration and continued under President Joe Biden, has seen tens of thousands of migrants trapped in Mexico without knowing when they may cross into the U.S. and receive a direct hearing.

A Russian and a Ukrainian embrace each other while the Russians await a humanitarian visa at the San Ysidro Border Port of Entry on the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico.

A Russian and a Ukrainian embrace each other while the Russians await a humanitarian visa at the San Ysidro Border Port of Entry on the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico.

A Russian woman cries while staying in a makeshift camp near San Ysidro Garita while listening to prayers

A Russian woman cries while staying in a makeshift camp near San Ysidro Garita while listening to prayers

Mexican officials agreed to an agreement with U.S. authorities to allow him to cross over

Mexican officials agreed to an agreement with U.S. authorities to allow him to cross over

42. Title rules have been suggested to be suspended in early April, and demand is likely to rise sharply, not only for immigrants from Central America and Mexico, but also for Ukrainians who have traveled to seek refuge. United States of America.

It is not something that the Russians who crossed the border at the beginning of the month will have to worry about now, because they have been given preferential treatment.

The group spent a terrific week sleeping in an makeshift camp on the streets of Tijuana, including a pregnant woman, in front of a walkway reserved for people crossing the border from Mexico to San Diego every day.

“It’s like Russian roulette,” math teacher Irina Moscow told Vice World News. “It’s completely unpredictable. You don’t know the steps. You approach the border without knowing what will happen. You reach the border, but you don’t know if the official immigration will let you pass. Then, when they cross, they arrest you, but you don’t know how long or why. ‘

After reaching an agreement, Russian citizens were detained in a detention center on the American side for a couple of days before being allowed to live freely in the country, awaiting immigration trials, probably a few months from now.

Irina Zolkina, who is seeking asylum in the United States, cries as she remembers a trip from Russia to the Mexican border near the port of San Ysidro to enter the United States.

Irina Zolkina, who is seeking asylum in the United States, cries as she remembers a trip from Russia to the Mexican border near the port of San Ysidro to enter the United States.

A Russian man is talking to a Customs and Border Protection official while he waits for others near the Port of Entry to the United States of San Ysidro in Tijuana, Mexico.

A Russian man is talking to a Customs and Border Protection official while he waits for others near the Port of Entry to the United States of San Ysidro in Tijuana, Mexico.

In early March, a dozen Ukrainians from the war-torn country came to Tijuana to cross into the United States, but were denied under Title 42 policy.

CBP officials were reminded that asylum seekers had the opportunity to be on a case-by-case basis in the country, particularly for humanitarian reasons.

He then saw that more Ukrainians were allowed to enter the country, even though the same rules did not apply to the Russians, even though they claimed to be suffering political persecution in their country for fighting the war.

This disagreement led to the construction of a camp of nearly 40 Russians in the Port of Entry into San Ysidro.

Every time the Russians tried to cross the border into the US, they were expelled, while the Ukrainians were more easily crossed and given humanitarian visas.

As the numbers grew, frustration on behalf of the Mexican authorities also increased as the camp was built.

Eventually an agreement was reached that he would allow the Russians to cross the border while the camp was cleared.

Asylum seekers in the United States are sleeping in an makeshift camp on the Mexican side of the port of San Ysidro Crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.

Asylum seekers in the United States are sleeping in an makeshift camp on the Mexican side of the port of San Ysidro Crossing in Tijuana, Mexico.

The Russians were constantly on the border, so a camp was set up in Tijuana

The Russians were constantly on the border, so a camp was set up in Tijuana

A Russian woman is hugging her son while they are waiting near the port of San Ysidro on their way to the United States in Tijuana (Mexico) earlier this month.

A Russian woman is hugging her son while they are waiting near the port of San Ysidro on their way to the United States in Tijuana (Mexico) earlier this month.

The two sides agreed to allow the Russians to go through border control known as El Chaparral.

The crossing was closed to migrants entering the United States and was used only to process deportations to return to Mexico.

The Russians were given a special exemption from crossing into the United States so that those staying at nearby hotels in Tijuana could cross paths with the rest of the group.

Families who crossed over to San Diego were warned to appear before immigration judges in the coming months, while those who were crossing were taken to the currently detained immigration detention centers.

The State Department has not commented on the special agreement negotiated, which “allows the U.S. and Mexico to work closely on a variety of issues, including migration,” on how they cooperate and how close relations between countries can “address the challenges of both talks.” our countries. ‘

Last week, the United States announced that it would accept 100,000 refugees fleeing the war in Ukraine, the Biden administration announced on Thursday.

U.S. authorities have recently allowed Ukrainian refugees to enter the U.S. on the southern border, with permission to stay in the U.S. but banned by Russian citizens.

U.S. authorities have recently allowed Ukrainian refugees to enter the U.S. on the southern border, with permission to stay in the U.S. but banned by Russian citizens.

Russian asylum seeker Nastya has been sitting outside the port of entry in San Ysidro after leaving the US without being crossed with family members.

Russian asylum seeker Nastya has been sitting outside the port of entry in San Ysidro after leaving the US without being crossed with family members.

It aims to alleviate the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Eastern Europe, in which nearly 3.5 million Ukrainians have fled the bombed country in one of the largest refugee crises since World War II.

Refugees have flooded Europe and some have even moved to the southern border of the United States in an attempt to enter the country.

In addition to receiving more displaced people, the Biden administration also announced new funding of more than $ 1 billion for humanitarian aid.

This funding will provide food, shelter, clean water, medical supplies and other assistance, according to the White House.

The United States has secretly released 35 Russian asylum seekers in the dark on the Mexican border

Source link The United States has secretly released 35 Russian asylum seekers in the dark on the Mexican border

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