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The daughter of a suspected DUI suspect says police treated her father “like rubbish”

The daughter of a man who died in custody at the California Highway Patrol after shouting “I can’t breathe” nearly a dozen times, says officers seen in a recently released police video say her father was treated for bleeding. like rubbish. ‘

The family of Edward Bronstein has filed a lawsuit related to his death on March 31, 2020, and has been charged with a CHP agent who was involved in the arrest on suspicion of driving under the influence.

Bronstein, a 38-year-old boy who died in police custody, was shot dead by George Floyd, an unarmed black man who was shot two months before the death of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on his neck for more than 8 minutes. he also repeatedly told the officers, “I can’t breathe.”

On Wednesday, Bronstein’s daughter Brianna Palomino, 22, and her lawyer, Michael Carillo, gave a press conference after the judge released a gruesome 18-minute video capturing the last moments of Bronstein.

“My father was a good person,” Palomino told NBC4. “No one deserves to be killed like that. They treated him like rubbish, as if his life wasn’t worth it. ‘

The woman said she wanted the officers involved in the arrests to be held accountable for their actions.

Carillo, who represents Palomino and his 12-year-old sister in a civil lawsuit, accused CHP of “covering up” for allegedly failing to tell his family what really happened to his father, and for blocking the video from almost being released. two years.

“They have put up all the obstacles imaginable,” he told DailyMail.com in a telephone interview on Thursday.

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Brianna Palomino, the daughter of Edward Bronstein, who died in the care of a California highway patrol in 2020, said in a press conference that her father was “treated like garbage.”

Bronstein protests blood donation, according to his family, fearing needles

Bronstein protests blood donation, according to his family, fearing needles

“His screams, his face, which give him a slap in the face, will live on in my head forever and there is nothing more than justice and to pay for what these agents have done,” Palomino added, referring to the graphic content of police footage. “I’d rather my father be here every day, and there’s nothing to take away that.”

Carillo, the family’s lawyer, slammed the officer in the video for ignoring his desperate cries and failing to help.

“She’s dead, she’s dead,” Carillo said. “She’s cold, she’s blue, and instead of trying to save her life, they give her a slap in the face, thinking she’ll wake a dead man.”

Bronstein, who worked at his father’s body shop for years, was arrested for an alleged DUI, but was taken to a police station after refusing to donate a blood sample, according to his family, for fear of needles.

Bronstein began to cry in fear after being stuck face down on the ground, and later died, but his efforts to revive him were unsuccessful.

The California Highway Patrol has struggled to release a police video of the man’s arrest after his family was prosecuted for abuse of power and civil rights violations, but a federal court judge ordered his release Tuesday.

Edward Bronstein, 38, died March 31, 2020, less than two months before police officer George Floyd was killed in Minnesota

Edward Bronstein, 38, died on March 31, 2020, after George Floyd told officers in Minnesota less than two months before he was killed, “I can’t breathe.”

An 18-minute video of the arrest, taken by a California Highway Patrol sergeant in Pasadena, showing Bronstein handcuffs, the father of five children, shows him arguing with police, being taken and forced into a mat on the floor of the Altadena station garage. he refused to give her a knee to take a blood sample.

He argues at first, but starts screaming in fear after being thrown to the ground.

“I’ll be glad to hear it,” Bronstein said as the two agents passed over him and told a man not to take a blood sample ordered by the court to determine his level of intoxication.

“You can give in and say you still don’t accept it,” the officer said as he continued to complain about his treatment. “It’s you who’s fighting, not us.”

“I’m not fighting at all,” says Bronstein, with an officer holding his hand on his shoulder.

“Then sit down and give me your arm. This is your last chance, ”said the patrolman. “Otherwise you’ll go face down on the map and move on.”

Bronstein’s family said he was afraid of needles.

The officer sniffs Bronstein and pulls his legs out from under him, bending to the ground.

Five agents can be seen kneeling on top of him, shouting “I’ll do it, I’ll do it willingly.”

“Too late,” says the officer. “It simply came to our notice then. You need to relax. ”

Then Bronstein said, “I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe.”

Edward Bronstein, here with his daughter, Isabella, died in police custody:

Edward Bronstein, here with his daughter, Isabella, died in police custody after repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe,” that they were on their knees trying to get a blood sample.

Eventually, he stops moving and the officers draw blood from his lame body.

A second video, more than 12 minutes long, shows officers and paramedics trying unsuccessfully to revive Bronstein.

They can be seen slapping his head and calling him a name.

They turned around and started giving CPR and oxygen, but they were not cured.

An officer told paramedics that Bronstein was complaining about “shortness of breath.”

“When we pulled it back, it was turning blue,” he said.

George Floyd, 46, was killed in May 2020 in Minneapolis after Knee Officer Derek Chauvin was shot in the neck in an arrest.

George Floyd, 46, was killed in May 2020 in Minneapolis after Knee Officer Derek Chauvin was shot in the neck in an arrest.

Shortly afterwards, someone reminds the group, “Everyone in front of the camera.”

The LA County Court of Justice ruled that the cause of Bronstein’s death was “acute methamphetamine poisoning by law enforcement.” A copy of the autopsy report was not immediately available.

A Los Angeles County District Attorney is demanding that the family be punished by officers.

The LA County District Attorney’s Office said it “continues to investigate the matter.”

“When the nation was in turmoil over the George Floyd tragedy, we didn’t know that it had happened to Mr. Bronstein,” said Luis Carrillo, a lawyer for Bronstein’s family.

“In my view, officials have shown a strict disregard for the value of human life and their actions should be investigated as a felony,” Philip Stinson, a professor of criminal justice at Bowling Green State University, told the Associated Press.

The state attorney general’s office is representing highway patrols and officers in the federal lawsuit and has sent media inquiries to the CHP.

Officer Shanelle Gonzalez, a spokeswoman for CHP, said the agency refuses to comment on the case due to pending lawsuits.

A 2021 law signed by Prime Minister Gavin Newsom makes it illegal for police to verbally detain suspects because the maneuver has resulted in a number of unintentional deaths. Inspired by the death of George Floyd, Bronstein passed away after his death.

Eric Garner, 43, died in July 2014 in State Island, NY, after being used by a choke on his neck by agents.

Eric Garner, 43, died in July 2014 in State Island, NY, after being used by a choke on his neck by agents.

Before Floyd, Eric Garner was arrested in a 2014 arrest warrant, he also complained that he could not breathe. Officers found that they had used a prohibited choke to control it. His death, in part, sparked the Black Lives Matter movement.

Stinson said the dangers were well known, but in this case the officers had prepared a mat, and it seemed that “it was a common occurrence for officers to take someone down by word of mouth to fill the mat. What they want.”

In addition, the comments to the camera indicated that they were willing to give a lesson to someone: “Well, if you don’t do what you want, we’ll do this.” it will be painful and painful for you, ”said Stinson, who reviewed the video at the request of The Associated Press.

Finally, Stinson said, “It looks like the man was being treated as if he was pretending to be unconscious.

Family members say Bronstein was afraid of the needles and believe that this is why he did not comply with the CHP at first because they were trying to take a blood sample. In the video, an officer tells Bronstein that they have a court order – Carrillo has doubts that the assertion was true.

Officers acted in a way that the public would no longer accept, said Eugene O’Donnell, a professor of police studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“This is just a potentially explosive situation,” said O’Donnell, who also reviewed the video at the request of the AP. “If he is not satisfied, the police cannot play these fighting games with the people because the consequences endanger some of the benefits.”

The lawsuit appoints nine officers and one sergeant.

Officers include Carlos Villanueva, Christopher Sanchez-Romero, Darren Parsons, Diego Romero, Dusty Osmanson, Eric Voss, Justin Silva, Dionisio Fiorella and Marciel Terry. He is also named Sergeant Michael Little.

A medical lawyer said the company he employs had “broken his heart” at the news of the death.

Attorney John C. Kelly said in a statement that the company is not involved in the arrest or physical manipulation of anyone, and only takes blood samples for testing. There are no medical permits or assessments available, and most do not have this training.

That was true in this case, he wrote, and when Bronstein had no answer, the company employee “provided the support he could under the circumstances.”

The daughter of a suspected DUI suspect says police treated her father “like rubbish”

Source link The daughter of a suspected DUI suspect says police treated her father “like rubbish”

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