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The black man was released from rape 47 years after he stated that the victim may have identified the wrong man.

The black man was released from rape charges after spending 47 years behind the bar after admitting that the white victim of the attack may have identified the wrong person.

The judge abandoned Tyrone Clark’s 1974 rape conviction on Tuesday, the day after another black man who mistakenly accused rape writer Alice Sebold was released on Tuesday.

Clark conducted his first interview with the DailyMail.com on Thursday, the day after he left prison, saying: I can’t think of the past. I just have to go ahead and try to take it a day at a time. I didn’t want to go out, so I thank God for answering the prayers I went out. “

Clark also shared his sympathy for Anthony Broadwater (61), who spent 16 years behind the bar for the rape of lovely bone writer Sebald. Broadwater was exonerated by the court on Wednesday, the day after Clark was cleared, after he was also revealed to be a victim of a misleading ID card.

Clark describes Broadwater as follows:

Tyrone Clark left prison on Wednesday after a judge abandoned the 1974 rape conviction.

“When I left jail, I was telling everyone that there were a lot of innocent men in the same situation as shoes, and I promised I wouldn’t leave them behind.

“Social injustice is very messed up.”

Clark, 66, has no sign that Suffolk Superior Court Judge Christine Roach had DNA stored in the victim’s Kane’s clothing in 1973 after a rape in Boston’s Back Bay district. After saying, he was released.

The handle of the knife used in the assault was also endangered by being touched over the last 40 years as the victim raised “real concerns” about the accuracy of her identity nearly 50 years ago. ..

This was the second case in a week after a black man was illegally imprisoned for rape. A man convicted of raping award-winning author Sebald 40 years ago was released on Monday.

Clark was sentenced to life imprisonment at the age of 18.

Clark is depicted in a Boston Police Department mugshot

Clark was 18 years old when he was sentenced to life imprisonment for the rape of Anne Kane, 23, who was attacked by a knife by a stranger who invaded Back Bay’s apartment in 1973.

Anthony Broadwater, 61, spent 16 years behind the bar for the 1981 rape, which was the focus of the 1999 memoirs of Seabold’s career development.

Clark left Gardner’s North Central Collectional Institute on Wednesday afternoon, but had no practical knowledge of identification, bank accounts, telephones, or the Internet.

Clark (right) was taken to Jerry Bronya (left), who started a boarding facility called Christophers House in honor of his son, who died in 2007.

Clark (right) was taken to Jerry Bronya (left), who started a boarding facility called Christophers House in honor of his son, who died in 2007.

His lawyer, Jeff Harris, took him to a restaurant and enjoyed his first dinner as a free man. Chicken, french fries, soda and dessert with onion rings.

On Thanksgiving Day, Clark was planning to have dinner with the stranger Jerry Bronya who took him.

“He is an angel from God,” Clark said. “He gave me clothes and stuff, and everything I needed. On the day of my release, I had nowhere to go and this man opened his house for me.

Bronya set up a boarding facility called Christophers House after his 23-year-old son died in 2007, and took Clark after being contacted by a former prisoner’s social worker.

Suffolk district attorney Rachael Rollins filed a petition in September in support of Clark's petition for a new trial.

Suffolk district attorney Rachael Rollins filed a petition in September in support of Clark’s petition for a new trial.

He is now trying to help Clark navigate a world that has changed dramatically since his conviction in 1973.

“I had a room available, and it grew from there,” Bronya told the DailyMail.com. “We are now bound together and are moving forward to make sure he understands what is happening here. Much has changed.”

Clark was convicted of raping and abducting Ankane in June 1973 after someone broke into her Back Bay apartment and raped her at Knife Point, and was in prison for nearly 50 years. spent.

Clark, then 18 years old, was sentenced to life imprisonment with possible parole.

He was released in 2005, but was sent back to prison within a year after violating the conditions of parole for stealing clothes and food, he said.

His mother and other relatives said he died during his second imprisonment and he is now trying to track down where his mother is buried.

“I’m a little sad because I want to go to my deceased mother and family,” he said with tears. “I just want to find my mother, so I can visit her.”

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins filed a petition in September in support of Clark’s petition for a new trial after alleging that Kane may have misidentified him.

According to the letter, Kane said:

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins said evidence of Clark's case had been destroyed.

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins said evidence of Clark’s case had been destroyed.

Kane, a white woman, said she relied on the courts to provide fair trials at the time, but now sees an overwhelming flaw in the criminal justice system.

She claims that her ability to properly identify perpetrators was affected because she did not know blacks at the time.

Rollins filed a Nole prosecution on Wednesday, officially ending Clark’s rape case.

“This case drew the attention of my office after the victim unsolicited and raised serious suspicions about the defendant’s identity,” Rollins said in a press release. “When we began investigating the case further, we learned almost half a century ago that the Commonwealth had lost or destroyed evidence of potential justification.

“Both the defendant and this administration have been denied the opportunity to carry out modern forensic examinations because the previous administration failed to maintain its DNA evidence. The Commonwealth never benefits from our failure or misconduct. Should not be received.

In a similar case this week, Broadwater was released after a producer working on Netflix’s adaptation of the writer’s memoirs noticed a story contradiction, hired a private detective to investigate it, and sent the case back to court. I did. When she was a 19-year-old freshman at Syracuse University in 1981, she wrote in her memoirs how she was raped by a black man in a tunnel. This book has sold over a million copies.

Painted in 2018, Sebald was lucky to find a black Broadwater on the street a few months later after being raped in Syracuse in May 1981 as a freshman.During the subsequent police lineup where Broadwater existed, Sebald chose someone else.

Tim Mucciante, who worked as the producer of the movie version of the book, began investigating the contradictions after learning that the script was very different from the original text of Sebald.

Sebald (left) is a photo of 2018 (left). Producer Tim Mucciante (right) working on her best-selling lucky adaptation before dropping out to dig deeper into the case.

Broadwater was convicted in 1982 after Sebald, now 59, identified him as a rapist in court. She passed the street a few months after the assault, passed him, and then told the police that she was her rapist, but she didn’t know his name.

Police officers named Broadwater because he was in the area when he was involved in the investigation.

In the police lineup, she chose the man standing next to him.

Anthony Broadwater, who spent 16 years in prison (photographed outside the court of Syracuse on Monday), was on Monday by a judge of rape writer Alice Sebold when she was a student at Syracuse University. It was cleared. 'lucky'

Anthony Broadwater, who spent 16 years in prison (photographed outside the court of Syracuse on Monday), was on Monday by a judge of rape writer Alice Sebold when she was a student at Syracuse University. It was cleared. ‘lucky’

But Broadwater was still on trial, and in court, Sebald chose him. Another piece of evidence that convicted him was hair analysis, but the method used has long been considered unreliable by the Department of Justice.

Broadwater was released from prison in 1999 when the book was published. He then lived a quiet life, worked as a garbage carrier, and got married, but refused to give birth because he did not want to live with the “stigma” of rape’s belief.

He was treated as a sex offender because he was registered as a sex offender.

Meanwhile, Sebald’s career soared.

In 2002, she published The Lovely Bones. This is another story based on child kidnapping and rape. With over 5 million copies sold and $ 60 million in sales in the United States alone, it became a blockbuster Hollywood movie starring Saoirse Ronan, Stanley Tucci and Mark Wahlberg in 2009.

Clark spent nearly 50 years at Gardner's North Central Orthodontic Institute

Clark spent nearly 50 years at Gardner’s North Central Orthodontic Institute

Clark said he was grateful that, despite all his experience, the rape victims in his case ultimately expressed concern about the illegal conviction.

“It took a lot of courage to do what she did,” he said. “There is God’s blessing. It took her a long time to come forward, but I still forgive her. I have never attacked her and never committed this crime. I have been innocent for 50 years. “

Clark’s GoFundMe raised nearly $ 6,000 early Thursday afternoon.

The black man was released from rape 47 years after he stated that the victim may have identified the wrong man.

Source link The black man was released from rape 47 years after he stated that the victim may have identified the wrong man.

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