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The Air Force was accused of pushing a woman through elite commando training after she quit.

Former Navy Seal Dan Crenshaw claimed that an unqualified female airman had been trained as a special tactical officer after quitting in hopes of becoming the first woman to complete an elite course. I’m looking for an answer.

The allegations were made in an anonymous email that was posted on Instagram and then shared by Crenshaw, a US Congressman of the Republican Party in Texas.

The trainee repeatedly quit, was allowed to rejoin the training “pipeline”, and performed an “unprecedented” special mission in one of the army’s most elite units, hoping to encourage her to continue. sponsored.

“You can’t sacrifice training standards. So far. The end,” Clenshaw wrote on Twitter. “If this explanation is true, our army now needs to deal with it.”

The Air Force is also seeking an inspector general’s investigation into allegations that the female captain, who wanted to be the first female elite special tactical airman, was given preferential treatment.

According to the whistleblower, who remains anonymous, the female captain received more favorable treatment than general under the “social norms” of Air Force soldiers with special tactical choices and training. ..

Lieutenant General Jim Slife, boss of the U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command, has called for a general investigation of inspectors following allegations that unqualified female Air Force soldiers have been trained as special operations officers. ..

Questions were raised as to whether aviators were given preferential treatment to stay in the pipeline, which allegedly quit multiple times.

Injured in Afghanistan in 2012, Klenshaw said, “Many women … make a significant contribution to special operations missions,” but they follow strict standards. Destroying them “will come at the expense of life,” he said.

A story shared online details how female special tactics officers have repeatedly abandoned the challenging selection process until they were first revived in 2018 by AFSOC and the leaders of the 24th Special Operations Command. Explaining.

The post describes training as “a rewarding week-long selection process for joining a special tactical community.”

The aviator quit during the pool session, but was still given the opportunity to finish, the details of the post.

Anonymous email screenshots were shared last week in an Instagram post by Texas Republican and Navy Seal veteran Dan Crenshaw, who asked for an answer.

Anonymous email screenshots were shared last week in an Instagram post by Texas Republican and Navy Seal veteran Dan Crenshaw, who asked for an answer.

The anonymous account that originally filed the accusation named the trainee Captain Morgan Mosby.

The anonymous account that originally filed the accusation named the trainee Captain Morgan Mosby.

Candidates have become known for quitting and receiving preferential treatment. She resigned at various points in the training, but she was scrutinized and monitored weekly by Congress and AFSOC leaders (O-6 and above), so all accounts were “polished under the rug.” I did. ”

The Air Force special forces selection process and training pipeline is one of the most difficult in the world, The accusation of lowering the standard was immediately refuted by Vice Admiral Jim Slife, commander of special operations of the Air Force.

“We can clearly say that the criteria associated with completing the mission haven’t changed,” Slife said in a long post on Facebook. “But there are differences between standards and norms.”

Slife explained that the “standards” of the training pipeline have changed over the last 15 years to ensure that Air Force personnel meet certain criteria. He explained that the standards are not currently changed, but may change in the future.

“It’s clear that the criteria that lead to the achievement of the mission haven’t changed,” Slife in the photo said in a long post on Facebook. “But there are differences between standards and norms.”

“It’s easy to confuse standards with norms, because over time, the norms we establish can become considered” standards, “” Slife writes. “A few years ago, the standard was to evaluate candidates by indoctrination. I learned that there are better ways to evaluate and select candidates for special tactical training and moved from Indoc.

“We will change the training method for air crew members to improve the effectiveness of the training, but we will not lower the standard …. Limit.

Slife said the story of the anonymous author is an example of cyberbullying.

“Selecting fellow military personnel for public abuse is bullying and harassment, an unacceptable deviation from both our standards, our norms, and our values ​​as an Air Force soldier,” he said. Told.

In stories posted on social media, the story stops after 2018 Phase II training and resumes in January 2020, when the captain started a 2-3 year training pipeline in Harbertfield, Florida.

Questions were raised as to whether aviators were given preferential treatment to stay in the pipeline, which was allegedly quit many times, including during surface training (file photo).

Questions were raised as to whether aviators were given preferential treatment to stay in the pipeline, which was allegedly quit many times, including during surface training (file photo).

The captain “quit at various points of training,” including during a pool session in front of a few students, but stayed on the course anyway.

The captain was allowed to participate in a special offer of a more relaxed version of the predive course. “

The captain then either quit again or “self-excluded” as the social media story explains during a single land navigation event.

Normally, pipeline students simply return to their previous mission, reclassify to another job, or leave the army, but the captain met with the 24th Special Operations Command and AFSOC’s “many senior leaders.” “.

According to the letter, the captain eventually returned to Phase II training the following year, but was unanimously handed over to the instructor to rejoin the special tactical program. Then the author said the leader had carefully selected her as a trainee candidate anyway.

The Air Force Special Forces selection process and training pipeline is one of the most difficult in the world, but the accusations of lowering standards were quickly refuted by Vice Admiral Jim Slife, Vice Admiral of Air Force Special Operations Command. ..

The Air Force Special Forces selection process and training pipeline is one of the most difficult in the world, but the accusations of lowering standards were quickly refuted by Vice Admiral Jim Slife, Vice Admiral of Air Force Special Operations Command. ..

The anonymous account that originally filed the accusation named the trainee Captain Morgan Mosby.

Slife refused to go into details about the experience that trainee Mosby might have endured to avoid additional attention and pressure on her.

He suggested that going out publicly was an act of bullying and harassment, contrary to military standards, norms and values.

“In addition, most of the author’s claims about her experience were either virtually wrong or lacked a significant context that completely changed perceptions,” Slife added.

In December, a special tactical airman was informed that the captain’s training status would “actively return on January 3, 2022,” but she chose to resign and had a negative view of ST. Did. The author said she would pick up the pipeline from where it was interrupted, at the request of Slife and Captain Jason Daniels, the current commander of the 24th Special Operations Force.

Slife said the story of the anonymous author is an example of cyberbullying

Slife said the story of the anonymous author is an example of cyberbullying

“For privacy and operational security, we will not discuss any further specific details regarding the selection of individual candidates and the progress of training so as not to put undue pressure on them,” said an AFSOC spokesman. One Savannah Stevens said. “All candidates must meet standard requirements and are equally evaluated for their ability to lead in physically and mentally difficult environments.”

Special tactical airmen under the 24th Special Operations Unit form a service ground combat unit, SEAL, Army Ranger to assist in calling for air strikes, providing medical care, and recovering injured and murderers. , Incorporates a Marine Corps raid corps.

Training is as rigorous as you would get in a two-year combat controller training pipeline, historically seeing 70-80% of candidates drop out.

Personnel, like other special forces such as the Army Special Forces and the Navy Special Forces, comply with technical and physical standards.

They are also extensively trained in the form of air traffic control and combat medicine to control crowded airspace, call for airstrikes, and evacuate injured troops from behind enemies.

Few women have been since the Air Force Special Forces pipeline was opened in 2015.

All allegations of

All allegations of “special treatment” given to female trainees were posted online

The Air Force was accused of pushing a woman through elite commando training after she quit.

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