Texas

Texas Parliamentary Race Begins to Shape

TEXAS — After completing the constituency changes that affect Texas politics over the next decade, the Republican-controlled state legislature sent a new parliamentary map to Governor Greg Abbott for approval. The proposed district almost guarantees that the Republicans will maintain an overwhelming majority in the delegation of the state legislature. Some candidates have already launched campaigns based on new district boundaries as legal issues arise.


What you need to know

  • New Parliament map sent to Texas Governor Greg Abbott for approval
  • Texas Republicans responsible for the constituency change have not created a new Hispanic majority district in Texas since 2010, even though Hispanics accounted for half of the state’s population growth. More than 95% of the state’s increase was due to colored races.
  • The Mexican-American Legal Defense Education Fund, on behalf of a coalition of civil rights groups, has sued the state for how maps affect the influence of Latin voters.
  • At the end of this term, at least a few Texas legislators will resign and vacant seats will be created.

Longtime Democrat Lloyd Doggett has previously run in a new district. He was trying to do it again and decided to run in the newly created 37th Parliamentary District. This is one of the two additional seats Texas will enjoy in the US House of Representatives from 2023 as a result of the state’s population growth. Perhaps one of the challengers is Austin’s lawyer and Julie Oliver, a two-time parliamentary candidate for the 25th Parliamentary District.

“The fact that Dogget decided to run there is very interesting,” said Brandon Rottinghaus, a professor of political science at the University of Houston. “He definitely bends his skeletal muscles.”

Not necessarily pulled out, Doggett has chosen to run in the new 37th Parliamentary District, anchored in his hometown of Austin. There is also a majority of Anglo. The decision leaves vacant seats in the 35th Parliamentary District, which stretches from Austin to San Antonio, and opens the door for elected Hispanic civil servants to retain seats for the majority of non-Anglo.

Texas Republicans responsible for the constituency change have not created a new Hispanic majority district in Texas since 2010, even though Hispanics accounted for half of the state’s population growth. More than 95% of the state’s increase was due to colored races.

Houston Republican Senator Joan Huffman, who created the new map, told lawmakers that the lines were “blind to race,” striving to ensure that the plan complies with the U.S. Constitution and Voting Rights Act. He said.

“The competitive one will be the CD-35,” said John Taylor, chairman of the Department of Political Science and Geography at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

State legislators Trey Martinez Fischer and Eddie Rodriguez are already emerging Democrats as candidates. So far, Greg Kazar, a member of the Austin City Council, has formally formed an investigative commission.

Talking to Capital Tonight, Kazar believed that the parliamentary line was discriminatory, saying that “kindergarteners can draw a straighter line.” He said he was dissatisfied with the Republican-led parliament and felt that the “progressive champion” of the federal parliament emphasized the need for federal intervention.

“Parliament needs to go through an automatic escalator to bring the minimum wage to $ 20 an hour for stable severance and medical care, not just $ 15 an hour,” said Casar. “Immigration reform, student debt cancellation, stable retirement, prevention of Wall Street people’s privatization of social security. That’s what we want to do in Congress.”

Texas Republicans have drawn another new seat in Harris County. The 38th Parliamentary District would have voted mostly for former President Donald Trump during the 2020 elections. Former Army combat veteran Wesley Hunt has announced his intention to run in the new district. Hunt fought a close quarters battle in 2020, losing only 3 percentage points in the 9th Parliamentary District.

Hunt told Capital Tonight that the map felt “very fair” and that Congress had largely escaped the Democratic incumbent.

“I have a very good opportunity to represent the values ​​of the people in this area, not the race of the people in this area,” Hunt said.

One of his biggest problems is protecting the oil and gas industry and retaining employment in that sector. Hunt also expressed concern about the treatment of the southern border and the obligations of masks and vaccines.

“What exactly is the role of the federal government? And its role is to keep citizens safe, but it also protects the rights and freedoms of individuals. These things will be very important to Congress. I think District 38 “.

Abbott hasn’t signed the map yet, but on behalf of a coalition of civil rights groups, the Mexican-American Legal Defense Education Fund shows how maps affect the influence of Latin voters. I sued the state for that reason.

At the end of this term, at least a few Texas legislators will resign and vacant seats will be created. They include Democrat Filemon Vela, a Democrat in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, and Kevin Brady, a Republican in East Texas.

Texas Parliamentary Race Begins to Shape

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