Texas

Texas and Mexico frontiers are still at the top of the news, state politics

Editor’s Note: Click here to be notified by email each time you publish a Ross Ramsey column.

If you want to listen to the column, click the play button below.

(Audio is not available. Click here to listen on texastribune.org.)

Undocumented immigrants have not killed 72,808 Texas in the last two years, as COVID-19 did until December 2.

However, fear of volatile borders has consistently outweighed the pandemic as a concern in Texas. That lasting concern for immigrants is the strongest among Republicans in the state. It masks other issues such as winter power outages, power grid failures, fraudulent elections and access to fraudulent elections, fist gun regulation, and abortion.

advertisement

After a year of record numbers of people moving from Mexico to Texas, Republican candidates (some of whom are executives) have strong political problems.

Republican voters have selected immigration and border security as the most important challenges facing the country for over a decade.

The crushing of people attempting to enter the United States this year has once again brought attention to the issue of immigration. Democrats are occupying the White House, giving Republican state governments a built-in political foil. Since Joe Biden took office, the number of undocumented migrants detained in Texas has increased by more than 50%. And with a slightly unexpected budget surplus, the state could spend nearly $ 3 billion on the problem in the form of barriers (walls, cars, shipping containers, etc.), state police, National Guard soldiers and assets. rice field.

advertisement

Its focus on borders comes at the beginning of the 2022 election cycle. Candidates apply to the office, raise funds, focus on issues to emphasize, and compile campaign materials.

From a political point of view, timing is a coincidence.

Republicans are looking to the border as Democrats are keenly watching grid failures during the winter storm that caused power outages almost across the state last February. Attention is high, their voters care about it, Republicans are acting for conservative Latin voters in the state’s border counties, and party candidates are already on the White House Democratic border and immigration issues. I have a lot of responsibilities.

advertisement

Party primaries are coming soon — March 1 must be pushed by a court challenge to the state’s new political map. And after the January vacation, it’s no wonder to watch videos of people crossing the border at Republican candidate campaign spots and videos of snow and dark cities in Democratic commercials.

At least they will be talking about the problem.

By the time the general elections heat up next fall, winter will be delayed and political conversations will continue unless this year’s freezes repeat.

The border is still there, and if the last few decades have been a map, it’s still in the hearts of voters. Last week, the Biden administration announced that it had renegotiated the “stay in Mexico” program, which the president had campaigned against. Its Trump-era program maintains immigrants seeking asylum in this country of Mexico while their status is taken into account. Biden ended it, but lost the legal challenge. Now it’s back in place, refocusing on issues that are of great importance to conservative voters.

advertisement

Other issues are important, but few are as permanent as border guards and immigrants. Democrats running for office in 2022 are facing obvious headwinds, such as the Republican constituency change map and the president’s sour approval number.

Add immigrants to those political issues. Powerful officials are already telling one certain story-and that’s their strength, while Democrats are waiting for bad weather and other unexpected news to help upset Republicans in 2022. It is something to demonstrate.

The snow may have melted, but the border is still there.

Texas and Mexico frontiers are still at the top of the news, state politics

Source link Texas and Mexico frontiers are still at the top of the news, state politics

Back to top button