Tech

Shetland fishermen are being boosted by government investment in submersible fishing

Photo of fishing boats at Hay’s Dock in Shetland Credit: Andy Waddington/CC BY-SA 2.0

A Scottish government agency has spent £ 185,000 in a piece of art to benefit the fishing industry and other fisheries operating in Shetland waters.

Imaging FlowCytobot submersible technology scans water samples for micro-algae and then sends the data to the world, allowing farmers to better understand the quality of the water. The investment, from the Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE) local development agency, came in a statement highlighting the importance of new technology to the fish industry. The study was initiated by the Nofima fish research institute under the name of the HIE and the Iceland Ocean Cluster.

Research has found that specific technologies, such as blockchain, the network of objects and artificial intelligence, are particularly relevant to the fishing industry in the waters of northern Scotland.


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Elaine Jamieson, head of the blue economy and food and beverage at HIE, said: “As demand for seafood continues to grow, so does the use of freshwater fish. Technology. This project explores ways to grow and maintain high -value opportunities in the fishing industry. The report demonstrates how using digital tools, such as blockchain, can boost customer confidence and global engagement. Being able to look at the entire journey of a product to see the value in terms of provenance, environmental protection, quality and reliability.

Gregg Arthur, director of fisheries management at the University of the Highlands and Islands in Shetland, said the FlowCytobot imaging was a “game changer” for Shetland’s fish industry.

“We’re excited to see the potential of the instrument,” he said. “[It] It gives us a higher resolution picture of the amount of phytoplankton at any given time and is a useful tool for observing the numbers and characteristics of these changes over the seasons. This is important information that can help us improve our approach to sustainable fish. Local fish rely on our understanding of our interactions with the natural environment and this tool greatly enhances our ability and knowledge of the place it is set up.

Shetland fishermen are being boosted by government investment in submersible fishing

Source link Shetland fishermen are being boosted by government investment in submersible fishing

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