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Review: Jamestown Revival, more than just a roadhouse band | Entertainment



This cover image, released by Thirty Tigers, shows Jamestown Revival’s “Young Man.”


Jackie Lee Young-Thirty Tigers, a one-time-use distribution


SCOTT STROUD-The Associated Press

Jamestown Revival, “Young Man” (Thirty Tigers)

The list of really good Americana roadhouse bands that have emerged from the Texas music scene over the years is long. A list of things that made themselves stand out by doing something fresh and original, not so much.

Jamestown Revival is now on both lists, thanks in part to its latest release, “Young Man.” With the help of Robert Ellis, a fellow of Texan and the original of true country music, the band brought the sound to its essence. In the process, I made music that shines as bright as the band has ever done.

The new album builds on the band’s strengths, especially the stunning harmony of core members Jonathan Clay and Zack Chance. They have always been great harmony singers. After all, these are the guys who recorded “California Dreamin” and the praiseworthy cover of Twin Peaks in the range of classic Crosby, Stills & Nash, and harmony-based rock and roll.

Here, Clay and Chance apply the same fearlessness to a stripped-down sound that somehow amplifies their talent in different styles. “Coyote” reflects the Western-style styling of Marty Robbins’ classic “Coolwater”. The melody immersed in the tradition of the title song provides the perfect background for the melancholy lyrics about the aging of the album and the best harmony songs.

Review: Jamestown Revival, more than just a roadhouse band | Entertainment

Source link Review: Jamestown Revival, more than just a roadhouse band | Entertainment

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