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Review: Idiosyncratic Tribute to Idiosyncratic Bands | Entertainment

One man who couldn’t be interviewed: Reed himself died in 2013 after a long solo career. Haynes collects some of all the audio clips and archived footage he can do to capture the dangerous energy of young leads. Instead of running a show he doesn’t want to do, he smashes his fist into a piece of glass.

Of course, Warhol, who died in 1987 and appeared in a quick clip, and Nico, a German singer whose blonde charm and stage presence helped secure the group’s first record deal, are also gone.

Haynes started in the early 1960s, when the group’s name and sound weren’t there yet, and wasn’t much praised. “No one hired us, so we had to change the name significantly,” Reed said.

But Reed knew what he wanted. “I want to be rich, and I want to be a rock star.”

The film includes the band’s founding 1967 first album “The Velvet Underground & Nico”, downtown shows, tour performances, West Coast stints, second album “White Light / White Heat”, and Nico. “She was a wanderer,” says Cale.

Whimsical Reed fires Warhol and then kicks Kale out. “I didn’t know how to please him,” says Cale. “You tried to be kind, he would hate you more.”

Review: Idiosyncratic Tribute to Idiosyncratic Bands | Entertainment

Source link Review: Idiosyncratic Tribute to Idiosyncratic Bands | Entertainment

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