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Review: Animated document “Escape” tells the journey of young refugees | Entertainment

Lindsey Bahr AP Movie Screenwriter

Filmmaker Jonas Poer Rasmussen was 15 years old when he met a new face on a local train in a sleepy Danish town. Immigrants were inevitable, but Rasmussen first noticed this child’s style. He had some or few.

Rasmussen knew the boy Amin (a pseudonym) who lived with a foster parent from Afghanistan, but didn’t know much about anything else. I went to high school together every day and eventually became friends. Amin didn’t talk about his past or his family, and Rasmussen didn’t investigate — after all, they were just children. It takes about 20 years for Amin to start telling the true story of his childhood to the then-active filmmaker Rasmussen. The result is the animated documentary “Flee”, which is easily one of the best movies of the year.

Amin and his family fled Kabul in the 1980s. They wanted to find asylum in Sweden, but for five years they faced impossible challenges and setbacks, continued to find themselves in Russia, and were exposed to the constant threat of police deportation or exploitation. rice field. Eventually, 15-year-old Amin landed alone in Denmark.

“Flee” introduces Amine, an adult who is preparing to tell a story to the world for the first time. Although he is a seasoned scholar with a longtime partner who wants to get married and buy a home, Amin hesitates to put himself first. The visuals seem to have sneaked into the therapist’s session, and the experience of listening to him hasn’t changed much. Amin is so used to hiding his truth, including the fact that he is gay, so he’s actually a pretty unreliable narrator at first, lying to the audience and the director. I am.

Review: Animated document “Escape” tells the journey of young refugees | Entertainment

Source link Review: Animated document “Escape” tells the journey of young refugees | Entertainment

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