Texas

Released from prison with the help of Donald Trump: Abdul Ghani Baradar, next Afghan chief

One of the Taliban co-founders, Mullah Abdul Ghanu Baradar, was released from prison in Pakistan three years ago at the request of the US government.

On Sunday, his troops confiscated Kabul, and he is now overturned to become Afghanistan’s next leader in a fateful reversal that humiliates Washington.

Haibatura Akunzada is the overall leader of the Taliban, but Baladar is the head of its political office and one of the most famous faces of the chiefs involved in the peace talks in Qatar.

At the age of 53, he was a deputy leader under former chief Muller Mohammed Omar, and his support for al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden led to a US-led invasion of Afghanistan after 9/11.

Baradar was reported to have flew from Doha to Kabul immediately on Sunday night as militants were attacking the presidential palace.

In February 2020, Baladar signed the Doha Agreement, which promised the United States to leave Afghanistan, based on the Taliban signing a power-sharing agreement with President Ashraf Ghani. In a statement, the United States said in September that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo “urged the Taliban to take this opportunity to build a political solution and reach a comprehensive and permanent ceasefire.”

Born in Uruzgan in 1968, Baradar grew up in Kandahar, the birthplace of the Taliban movement.

He fought the Mujahideen and the Soviets in the 1980s until he was expelled in 1989.

Later, Afghanistan was involved in a bloody civil war between rival warlords, and Baradar established an Islamic school in Kandahar with former commander Mohammed Omar.

The two Mullahs embraced the legitimacy of the hardliners and contributed to the creation of the Taliban movement, an ideology that sought to create the Islamic Emirate.

The Taliban, supported by enthusiasm, hatred of greedy warlords, and financial support from Pakistan’s secret service, seized power after conquering the state capital in 1996 before marching in Kabul.

Baladar played various roles during the Taliban’s five-year reign and was Deputy Defense Minister during the 2001 US invasion.

He began to hide, but continued to work in the exiled Taliban leadership.

In 2010, the CIA tracked him to the Pakistani city of Karachi, and in February of that year the Pakistani Intelligence Agency (ISI) arrested him.

However, in 2018, he was released at the request of the Trump administration, with the understanding that he could help the peace of the broker, as part of ongoing negotiations with the Taliban in Qatar.

Taliban fighters sit at a table in the presidential office of Kabul's palace on Sunday after claiming victory

Taliban fighters sit at a table in the presidential office of Kabul’s palace on Sunday after claiming victory

Taliban fighters laughing and joking after attacking Kabul's parliament

Taliban fighter in parliament

Taliban fighters laughing and joking after attacking Kabul’s parliament

In February 2020, Baladar signed the Doha Agreement, which promised the United States to leave Afghanistan, based on the Taliban signing a power-sharing agreement with the government of President Ashraf Ghani of Kabul.

In a statement, the United States said in September that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo “urged the Taliban to take this opportunity to build a political solution and reach a comprehensive and permanent ceasefire.”

Pompeo welcomed Afghanistan’s leadership and ownership of its efforts to end the 40-year war and prevent Afghanistan from threatening the United States or its allies. “

The Doha Agreement was foretold as a serious declaration of peace, but proved to be nothing more than a Taliban ploy.

Jihadists waited for thousands of US troops to leave before launching a major attack to recapture the country, canceling 20 years of work by a US-led coalition.

Hibatullah Akhnzada, Afghanistan’s future chief, Taliban Islamic representative

Hibatullah Akhnzada, “Chief of the Beliefs,” is the Taliban’s commander-in-chief and gives the final remarks on his political, religious and military policies.

Akhundzada is expected to take the title of Afghan chief.

He is believed to be about 60 years old, unknown in military strategy, but respected as an Islamic scholar and governs the Taliban by his rights.

He took over in 2016 when Akhtar Mansour, the former chief of the group, was killed in a US drone strike on the Pakistani border.

After being appointed leader, Akhnzada made a pledge of allegiance from al-Qaeda chief Aiman ​​Zawahiri. He praised religious scholars and called him “the chief of the congregation.”

This helped seal his jihad qualification with the group’s longtime allies.

Akhundzada became the head of the Taliban's Council of Religious Scholars after the invasion of the United States and is believed to be the author of many of its fatwas (Islamic legal ruling).

Akhundzada became the head of the Taliban’s Council of Religious Scholars after the invasion of the United States and is believed to be the author of many of its fatwas (Islamic legal ruling).

Akhundzada reveals that the big challenge of unifying the militant movement that temporarily collapsed during the fierce power struggle after the assassination of its predecessor and that the leadership had hidden the death of Taliban founder Mullah Omar for years. Was imposed.

The leader’s public profile is primarily limited to the release of annual messages during Islamic holidays.

Akhundzada was born around 1959 to a religious scholar in the Panjwayi district of Kandahar.

His family was forced to flee their home during the Soviet invasion, and he joined the resistance as a young man.

He was one of the first Taliban recruits in the 1990s and soon impressed his boss with his knowledge of Islamic law.

When the Taliban occupied West Farah, Afghanistan, he was responsible for fighting crime in the area.

As the Taliban occupied more of the country, Akunzad became the head of the military court and the deputy secretary of the Supreme Court.

After the 2001 invasion of the United States, he became head of the Taliban’s Council of Religious Scholars, the author of many of his fatwas (Islamic legal decisions), including public executions of murderers and adulterers and cutting the hands of thieves. Is believed to be.

Before being appointed as a new leader, he had preached and taught at the mosque in Kuklak, a town in southwestern Pakistan, for about 15 years, sources told Reuters.

Released from prison with the help of Donald Trump: Abdul Ghani Baradar, next Afghan chief

Source link Released from prison with the help of Donald Trump: Abdul Ghani Baradar, next Afghan chief

Back to top button