Texas

Public schools blame the pandemic on rising behavior problems

Nearly 90 percent of U.S. public schools say the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the socioemotional development of their students, according to federal data released Wednesday.


What You Need to Know

  • In a May survey of 846 public schools conducted by the National Centers for Education Statistics, which are part of the Department of Education, 87% of schools said the pandemic negatively affected socio-emotional development over the past school year.
  • Eighty-three percent of schools agreed that the development of student behavior was also stunted.
  • Seventy-two percent of schools also say they have seen an increase in chronic absenteeism, defined as a lack of at least 10% of school years.
  • The survey also highlighted the difficulties schools face when teachers are absent, and 61% indicated that it was difficult to find a replacement.

In a May survey of 846 public schools conducted by the National Center for Educational Statistics, which is part of the Department of Education, 87% of schools said the pandemic negatively affected socioemotional development over the past school year and 83% agreed that the behavior of the students the development was also stunted.

COVID-19 has severely disrupted the 2019-20 and 2020-21 school years, as schools have closed their doors, forcing children to learn at a distance. During the 2020-21 school year some students returned to classrooms, but many others continued with online classes or opted for a hybrid approach.

Last academic year, 99% of schools offered full-time face-to-face teaching, while a third continued to offer full-time distance learning and 9% had a hybrid option, according to the survey.

But even though school schedules have mostly returned to normal, the pandemic was still taking its toll on classrooms.

Colleges more frequently reported increases that they attributed at least in part to the pandemic in classroom interruptions due to student misconduct (56%), noise outside the classroom (49%), acts of disrespect to teachers and staff (48 %) and the prohibited use of electronic devices (42%).

Seventy-two percent of schools also say they have seen an increase in chronic absenteeism, defined as missing at least 10% of school years.

“Students thrive in an environment with effective social, emotional, and behavioral support,” assign commissioner Peggy G. Carr said in a statement. “So when we see that 72 percent of our public schools report an increase in chronic absenteeism among our students, it’s an opportunity for educational leaders to act quickly using proven approaches that work. It’s our responsibility to assign disseminating data that describe the gravity of the situation “.

The survey also highlighted the difficulties schools faced when teachers were absent, and 61% indicated that it was difficult to find a replacement. Only 1% said they always found a submarine.

When substitutes are not available, schools rely on administrators, non-teaching staff, or other teachers who use their planning periods to fill.

Public schools blame the pandemic on rising behavior problems

Source link Public schools blame the pandemic on rising behavior problems

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