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Outdoors: On a hot Texas day | Sport News

The first round of Texas summer is likely to make way for more normal weather for a while, but as we approach true summer weather patterns, a recent rehearsal should remind those who enjoy the great outdoors of what it takes to stay calm. Live. healthy in hot weather.

Whether you work outdoors or spend leisure time there, nothing will spoil the day like a heat-related illness. I’ve lived my five decades mostly in Texas, and although I know how to get through the summer safely, I sometimes find myself approaching the red line of heat stress.

When you’re on water, you’re not only dealing with sunlight shining on you, you’re also dealing with light bouncing off the surface. The two main ways to stay healthy are hydration and skin protection, but there are other strategies for having fun while battling the Texas blast furnace known as summer.

Fishing during low light conditions, such as around dawn and dusk, will not only keep you out of the heat and sun, but also prime feeding times for bass. Like all creatures, they seek the most comfortable places, and during hot hours, bass will move to deeper waters where light is scattered and temperatures are cooler. During periods of low light, they usually move to shallower areas to ambush prey. You can still catch fish while they’re suspended in deeper water, and crank baits are an effective and versatile tool that lets you adjust depth and speed until you find the right spot.

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Other things to keep yourself safe from the heat include wearing light, light-colored clothing, taking breaks from direct sunlight, regularly getting your hat and shirt wet, and continuing to drink plenty of water. Beer is cold and wet, but works against your hydration.

Signs of heat stress include fatigue, headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness, thirst, extreme sweating, increased body temperature, and irritability. If you ignore it, you can begin to feel disoriented, slurred speech, seizures, and possibly death.

Stock report

Catching a lot of fish doesn’t just happen. Almost anyone can catch an occasional fish thanks to dumb luck, but successful anglers consistently have a combination of knowledge, equipment, imagination and adaptability in their war chests.

But even the best of us can’t catch fish if they’re not there, and that’s why scientists at Texas Parks and Wildlife are working year-round to make sure there’s something waiting for your bait, regardless of your skill level.

Fisheries biologists regularly sample populations in Texas waters, and based on their findings, they plan and execute stocking strategies to keep our lakes and rivers healthy.

So far this month, the TPWD team has provided 86,000 striped hybrid basses to Lake Waco, 210,000 striped basses at Lake Whitney along with 10,000 smallmouth basses at the Whitney Dam tailrace, and more than 2 million striper hybrids at Lake Belton.

But don’t grab your gear and try to catch them just yet. The fish stocked are fry or fry, which means it can take two or three years before the group is ready to be caught.

This is the lowdown

Watching bigmouth bass erupt to the surface, sending spray everywhere as you tail dance and head thrash across the water is exciting, but experienced anglers know when it happens, your chances of getting bass in hand drop significantly.

Bass use a number of tricks to break free, such as wrapping around a submerged tree stump or other structure, but getting out of the water allows them to use unfettered force to rock the hook. When you are hooking sea bass, keep the tip of your rod low, even submerge the end in the water, and use finesse to keep the fish out of the water. Catching them is much more satisfying than watching them give you feedback.

Fishing for things other than fish

You never know what you might find along the shores of Lake Waco. People have lived in Central Texas for over 10,000 years, and you can sometimes find artifacts since then. I have found a number of arrowheads and other tools made and used by ancient people, along with things from more recent history.

But long before people inhabited this area, Central Texas was under the sea, and marine fossil evidence is everywhere for evidence. When I was a kid, I found my first fossilized shark tooth on the edge of Airport Park, and the amazing discovery piqued my interest in digging the ground.

By law, it is against the law to remove artifacts from federal property, including lakes.

Classical Bohemian Bass

People in the West know how to throw a party, and today’s weigh-in at the 41st Annual Bohemian Bass Classic at Parsons Marina Lake Whitney should entertain more than just seeing quality fish. Weighing starts at 2pm and the celebrations are likely to last well into the evening.

To remember

Condolences to the family and friends of fishing legend Ray Scott. Scott, along with my predecessor Earl Golding, were pioneers in the competitive fishing industry.

Outdoors: On a hot Texas day | Sport News

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