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Off with his head!How the French Revolutionary Architect ended up putting his neck on the block

This week’s book

Robespierre’s Collapse: 24 Hours in Revolutionary Paris

By Colin Jones (OUP £ 25,592pp)

In the midst of the French Revolution, in 1794, a beautiful young aristocrat, Thérésa Talleus, who sat in a cell in Paris, wrote a desperate and bitter letter to his lover, telling him that he would soon be sent to the guillotine.

The night before, she dreamed of leaving Robespierre, the country’s most feared leader, who designed the arrest as an “enemy of the Republic,” and opening a national prison.

“But thanks to your obvious cowardice, no one will soon be left in France who can make my dreams come true,” she wrote. But by the next day, after one of the most dramatic 24 hours in the history of the French Revolution, Almighty Robespierre was banished to a rebellion led by Teresa’s lover.

Maximilien Robespierre has been on the rise since the early days of the 1789 revolution. The widespread riots caused by soaring food prices, unemployment and the collapse of social inequality have led to a series of radical new laws, including state control. Abolition of Catholic Church and feudalism.

The Collapse of Robespierre: 24 Hours of Revolution Paris explores how French Revolution architect Maximilien Robespierre (the country’s most feared leader) plunged into the guillotine and ended.

The first French Republic was founded in 1792, and the following year King Louis XVI and his Queen Marie Antoinette were executed.

Within a few years of arriving in Paris, Robespierre became a key member of a small legislative committee that almost completely controlled the French government.

Although not a natural speaker, he had the ability to excite and inspire his audience and at the same time scare those who oppose him. According to historian Colin Jones, his stone-like look and quiet gaze can “stop growing men in their footsteps and provoke catastrophic despair.”

Robespierre enjoyed celebrity status in Paris and gained particularly strong support among women, but he was still rumored to be a virgin.

He stayed with the carpenter and his family, enjoyed a cozy family life that was in complete opposition to his chilly and secluded personality, often went for a walk with the landlord’s daughters, and in the park with them. I enjoyed the picnic.

He had a very good affinity with Sans-culottes, a working-class revolutionary in shabby clothes, but he was a dandy with silk stockings and hair powder. Like many tyrants, Robespierre was prickly and thin-skinned about criticism.

In the early days of the revolution, he was enthusiastic about press freedom, but as soon as he came to power, his view changed.

An obscure local lawyer, Maximilien Robespierre (pictured), has enjoyed a rapid rise since the early days of the 1789 revolution, and although he has a strong affinity with working-class revolutionaries, he wears silk stockings and hair. It was a powdered dandy.

An obscure local lawyer, Maximilien Robespierre (pictured), has enjoyed a rapid rise since the early days of the 1789 revolution, and although he has a strong affinity with working-class revolutionaries, he wears silk stockings and hair. It was a powdered dandy.

“Freedom of the press is only in tranquility,” he declared. “We must ban writers as the most dangerous enemy of people.”

In the political repercussions of the 21st century, he often opposed “false news” and was convinced that most of it was upset by the British.

Previously opposed to the death penalty, he soon became his greatest enthusiast and personally signed more than 500 arrest warrants. He is promoting a law that allows juries to make decisions based on “moral beliefs” rather than evidence, and defendants no longer have the rights of lawyers.

This heralded the arrival of an era of bloody terrorism in which the perceived enemies of the revolution, primarily aristocrats, priests, and those accused of stocking, faced harsh summary justice.

Many were found to be monitoring executions, but by July 1794, concerns about the death toll were heightened, as nobles were the only ones to be specifically guillotine-coated. Today, people with humble backgrounds, such as grocery stores and maids, are loaded into the turmoil.

In the midst of the French Revolution in 1794, the beautiful young aristocrat Teresa Cavalus (pictured) wrote a desperate and bitter letter from his cell in Paris to his girlfriend Jean-Lambert Tallien, who soon became a guillotine.

In the midst of the French Revolution in 1794, the beautiful young aristocrat Teresa Cavalus (pictured) wrote a desperate and bitter letter from his cell in Paris to his girlfriend Jean-Lambert Tallien, who soon became a guillotine.

The execution of 16 nuns at the beginning of the month was particularly disturbing. In awe, the crowd watched, “They prayed together at the foot of the scaffolding, courageously marched towards the guillotine, and chanted VeniCreator to the last swish of the blade.”

Executioners have found that women are particularly brave and often smile until they die.

“On the road to the guillotine, smiles have become a quiet weapon of symbolic resistance,” says Jones.

On July 26, 1794, Robespierre delivered a long and emotional speech to a rally of parliamentarians known as the Treaty, criticizing the government and demanding the eradication of traitors. When challenged, he refused to give it a name. It was to prove a fatal mistake. That meant that almost all lawmakers felt threatened.

His enemy seized the chance to attack the next day. Among them, the chief was an ambitious young lieutenant Jean-Lambert who opposed Robespierre for political reasons and hated Robespierre because he was responsible for the arrest of Thérésa Tallez, who was executed shortly after his lover. It was Lambert Tallien.

The next day, after one of the most dramatic 24 hours in the history of the French Revolution, Almighty Robespierre was banished to a rebellion led by Teresa's lover.Photo: Arrest of Maximilien Robespierre

The next day, after one of the most dramatic 24 hours in the history of the French Revolution, Almighty Robespierre was banished to a rebellion led by Teresa’s lover.Photo: Arrest of Maximilien Robespierre

Tarian hid his dagger under his coat, rushed into parliament, accused government members of working against France, and said he “exacerbated the problem and threw it into the abyss.” He didn’t name Robespierre, but it was clear to everyone what he meant. Several lawmakers prepared by Tarian cheered loudly. Immediately others joined.

In the thrilling chapter, Jones shows how the balance of forces diminished and flowed within the chamber. Robespierre tried to speak repeatedly, but screamed. His enemies took revenge when they denied the right to speak to others.

The most powerful man in the country saw his support run down in front of him.

He, his younger brother, Augustine, and three other supporters were arrested. In the next chaotic time, they could move around Paris and even escape from their prison at some point. While this was happening, Robespierre, a plotter in the back room rather than an activist, wondered if he would try to riot.

Early the next morning, he was shot by his chin. Some claim he was trying to commit suicide, while others claim he was shot by a police officer.

Robespierre was alive, suffering from wounds, but was taken to the Place de la Concorde, where a “huge and enthusiastic crowd” watched over his execution. When he was pushed forward towards the guillotine, he uttered a “bloody animal scream.”

The following year, the Revolutionary Court, which sentenced so many people to death, was abolished, press freedom was restored, and many tragic reports were published about people suffering in prison.

But two centuries later, people are still discussing Robespierre’s legacy.

Robespierre's Collapse: Revolutionary 24 Hours in Paris by Colin Jones (OUP £ 25, 592pp)

Robespierre’s Collapse: Revolutionary 24 Hours in Paris by Colin Jones (OUP £ 25, 592pp)

Colin Jones, a professor of history at Queen Mary University of London, handles a vast amount of material with skill and enthusiasm.

He creates very vivid minute portraits of Paris and its people on that crucial day, but for those who are not completely immersed in the history of the French Revolution, the abundance of details is overwhelming. Seems like.

Curiously, Professor Jones does not reveal what happened to the aristocrat Thérésa Talleuth, whose prison letter was one of the sparks for the overthrow of Robespierre.

According to one study, Tarian successfully released her and married with another famous beauty, Josephine de Beauharnais, who was to become Empress Josephine of Napoleon.

Although the marriage did not last long, she was still well known for her moderate influence on her husband and was ready to sue the cause of those imprisoned and afraid of the guillotine blade like her.

Off with his head!How the French Revolutionary Architect ended up putting his neck on the block

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