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NYC advises residents to stay INSIDE and Boston declares emergency as ‘heat dome’ settles

A ‘heat dome’ is set swallow the US today as the scorching temperatures soar above triple figures – with the ‘dangerous’ heatwave hitting highs of 118F. 

More than 265million people will be at risk, with a third of the American population being issued with excessive heat warnings. 

Rising temperatures across the country have caused Boston to declare a ‘heat emergency’ while New York City officials are urging residents to stay inside for their own safety.  

Michelle Wu, Boston’s Mayor, declared the emergency and has launched dozens of cooling centers across the city to help protect locals.

The National Weather Service has also issued a heat advisory until 8pm tonight in Boston, with the heat index forecast to soar past 100 degrees.

Jackie Bray, commissioner of New York’s homeland security and emergency services division,  has urged residents to stay indoors rather than risk the ‘dangerous’ heatwave. 

She pushed for the move so locals can avoid ‘dangerous conditions that can lead to heat stress and illness’.

New York will reach 97F, while Death Valley in California is set to reach a scorching 118F and  Las Vegas estimated to soar to at least 113F today. 

At least one-third of the US population has been issued with heat advisories and excessive heat warnings and roughly 265 million people will see temperatures above 90 degrees in the coming days.

A ‘heat dome’ covering the country is largely due to a persistent region of high pressure trapping heat over an area.

Locals in New York flocked to Rockaway Beach yesterday to soak up the sunshine on the East Coast with temperatures set to hit 97F today

Locals in New York flocked to Rockaway Beach yesterday to soak up the sunshine on the East Coast with temperatures set to hit 97F today

Construction workers took a break in the shade from working on pipes in San Antonio, Texas, where temperatures will reach triple figures

Construction workers took a break in the shade from working on pipes in San Antonio, Texas, where temperatures will reach triple figures

Families in Houston, Texas, were quick to cool off in swimming pools yesterday after the state was issued with an excessive heat warning by the National Weather Service

Families in Houston, Texas, were quick to cool off in swimming pools yesterday after the state was issued with an excessive heat warning by the National Weather Service

New Yorkers sunbathed in Washington Square Park yesterday, laying down their towels as they enjoyed the scorching sunshine

New Yorkers sunbathed in Washington Square Park yesterday, laying down their towels as they enjoyed the scorching sunshine

Heat index levels: What are the risks?

Caution: 80 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit

Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity 

Extreme caution: 90 to 103 degrees 

Heat stroke, heat cramps, or heat exhaustion possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity 

Danger: 103 to 124 degrees

Heat cramps or heat exhaustion likely, and heat stroke possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity 

Extreme danger: 125 degrees or higher

Heat stroke highly likely

Source: Weather.gov

New York City could also be facing the longest heatwave in nearly a decade, with seven straight days of temperature above 90F, which last happened in 2013.

If the scorching conditions last eight consecutive days it would be one of the ten hottest in history, with the record of 12 days being set in 1953. 

The Big Apple’s energy company, Con Edison, is also advising residents to limit their energy use to avoid blackouts.

Officer workers in the city are claiming that their air conditioning has been shut off because of the ‘mandatory demand response’. 

Yesterday a horrified resident released footage of his UPS driver collapsing in the extreme Arizona heat.

The doorbell video, shared by Brian Enriquez from Scottsdale, shows the man leaning over to deliver the parcel before falling and slumping to the ground.

He lies there for a few moments before standing up, ringing the doorbell, and then ‘staggering away’, as temperatures reached 110F in Phoenix.

Enriquez told KPNX News in Mesa: ‘I was concerned for the fact that he was stumbling to the door.

‘Had I gotten to my phone sooner, I could have talked to him through my Ring, but he had already left the property at that point.’

The homeowner called the police to see if they could help, with UPS confirming that the driver had not been seriously injured.

In a statement UPS said: ‘UPS drivers are trained to work outdoors and for the effects of hot weather.

‘Our employee used his training to be aware of his situation and contact his manager for assistance, who immediately provided assistance.

‘Our package delivery vehicles make frequent stops, making air conditioning ineffective.’

High temperatures across the nation are largely due to a persistent region of high pressure trapping heat over an area, called a 'heat dome'

High temperatures across the nation are largely due to a persistent region of high pressure trapping heat over an area, called a ‘heat dome’

Temperatures in the United States are set to exceed triple figures across the nation with the southern states being hit hardest

Temperatures in the United States are set to exceed triple figures across the nation with the southern states being hit hardest

Multiple wildfires have been burning through Texas, with homes and structures in Palo Pinto County, punctured on Monday, being destroyed

Multiple wildfires have been burning through Texas, with homes and structures in Palo Pinto County, punctured on Monday, being destroyed

Children were quick to cool down in water jets in Houston, Texas, with other states setting up cooling stations to allow residents to access water and shade

Children were quick to cool down in water jets in Houston, Texas, with other states setting up cooling stations to allow residents to access water and shade

At least one third of the US population has been issued with head advisories and excessive heat warnings and roughly 265 million people will see temperatures above 90F

At least one third of the US population has been issued with head advisories and excessive heat warnings and roughly 265 million people will see temperatures above 90F

Scorching temperature are expected to last until at least Friday, with meteorologists warning that above average highs will be 'dominating' the country

Scorching temperature are expected to last until at least Friday, with meteorologists warning that above average highs will be ‘dominating’ the country

Workers put neon rims on their hard hats with neck covers in an attempt to keep cool in the burning San Antonio sun today

Workers put neon rims on their hard hats with neck covers in an attempt to keep cool in the burning San Antonio sun today

A surge of wildfires has been breaking out in North America as temperatures continue to soar 

United-States

California – Yosemite National Park

Fire erupted on July 8 in part of California’s Yosemite National Park, home of some of the largest and oldest giant sequoia trees in the world. Flames consumed 3,772 acres according to a report by InciWeb, a U.S. interagency all-risk incident information management system, as per July 13.

None of Yosemite’s landmark sequoias had been lost as of July 11. read more

Arizona

The so-called Pipeline Fire, which erupted on April 17, in the Coconino National Forest, the Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, and the Lack Bill Park, north Flagstaff city, in Arizona.

The fire burned more than 20,000 acres and prompted the mandatory evacuation order of more than 2,100 homes. read more

New Mexico

The merger between the Hermits Peak Fire in the southern Sangre de Cristo Mountains in San Miguel County, and the Calf Canyon Fire, in the east of Santa Fe, constitutes the New Mexico’s largest blaze to date. Each fire started on April 6 and April 19, respectively, and burned 341,735 acres as of July 15, according to a report by Santa Fe National Forest Services. The flames are now contained at 93%.

California – Big Sur

The rare winter blaze, dubbed the Colorado Fire, burned 1,050 acres south of Monterey and just north of the area known as Big Sur in California, from Jan. 21 to Jan. 24. It forced about 500 people under evacuation orders and shut a major highway. read more

Canada

British Colombia 

A blaze broke out on July 14 near the village of Lytton, in British Columbia. It is the most significant wildfire in the province so far this year, according to BC Wildfire Service.

The day after the fire broke out, nearly 2,000 acres were burned. Local authorities issued evacuation orders to 24 property owners close to the fire, while residents of several First Nation reserves were told to flee the area

Credit: Reuters

A UPS driver told ABC News that their vans do not have air conditioning due to frequent stops, adding that drivers are ‘dropping like flies’ in the heat. 

He claimed that when a drivers suffers from heat exhaustion then they are sent home with no treatment and if they do seek medical care it is up to them.

They added: ‘The fact of the matter is that no amount of training can prepare your body for 160 degrees, 10 to 12 hours a day, six days a week.

‘Every week drivers are dropping like flies due to heat conditions and UPS is killing drivers because of this.’

Maricopa county, where Scottsdale is located, reported 339 heat-related deaths in 2021, a record number of such fatalities.

Of the hundreds of people who died as a result of the heat, at least 130 homeless people were killed in the scorching temperatures.

Experts have said that if they had died in any other way it would be considered a ‘mass casualty event’, with many on the streets being forced to sleep in stifling tents before being moved on by cops.

About two-thirds of the heat associated deaths in greater Phoenix so far this year involved people who were outdoors, according to the latest statistics from the Maricopa County Department of Health.

The heat associated deaths from the first half are far above those seen in the county during the same period in past years.

There were 11 such fatalities in the first six months of 2021 with 107 more under investigation; four during that period in 2020 with another 48 under investigation; and three in 2019 with another 27 under investigation.

Excessive heat causes more weather-related deaths in the United States than hurricanes, flooding and tornadoes combined, with around half of the 1,500 heat-related deaths a year estimated to be those who are homeless. 

Meteorologist Domenica Davis of the Weather Channel warned that the southern plains will be worst hit by the sweltering heat, but above average temperature will be ‘dominating’ the country.

She expects temperatures to be up between five to 15 degrees, adding that there is a ‘potential for record breakers’ as many cities will hit higher than 100F.

Excessive heat warnings are also in place until 10pm this evening across San Joaquin Valley, lower Sierra foothills, and the Kern River Valley.

The National Weather Service has also issued the warning across parts of Texas, including Dallas and Fort Worth.

Northern Louisiana, Eastern Texas, Memphis, Mississippi, Arkansas and Oklahoma are also covered by the excessive warning.

New Jersey, Delaware, parts of New York and Philadelphia have also been issued with a heat advisory – while other parts of the country have been put on a fire weather watch.

Little Rock, Arkansas, recorded temperatures of at least 100F for the tenth day this year on Tuesday.

The National Weather Service warned that today will be ‘another brutal day’, with rising temperatures.

Texas is continuing to face drought conditions amid the excessive heat. Emily Buss, 16, left is seen here reaching for an umbrella to put on the lifeguard stand at the Allen Bolden Outdoor Pool

Texas is continuing to face drought conditions amid the excessive heat. Emily Buss, 16, left is seen here reaching for an umbrella to put on the lifeguard stand at the Allen Bolden Outdoor Pool

A man cooled off in a fountain at Rockefeller Center in Manhattan on Tuesday, with the heatwave reaching record breaking potential

A man cooled off in a fountain at Rockefeller Center in Manhattan on Tuesday, with the heatwave reaching record breaking potential

A couple took advantage of the heat to go for a paddle on Central Park Lake before posing for a picture

A couple took advantage of the heat to go for a paddle on Central Park Lake before posing for a picture

Children did not seem to mind the looming heatwave as they played in a water fountain in Boston, Massachusetts

Children did not seem to mind the looming heatwave as they played in a water fountain in Boston, Massachusetts 

Wildfires have broken out across the country leaving waves of devastation in their wake, with the largest blaze breaking out in Texas.

On Tuesday the Chalk Mountain Fire blackened 6,000 acres, and was only ten per cent contained after breaking out Monday afternoon.

Crews using bulldozers were forced to dig containment lines as fire tricks and aircrafts battled to extinguish the flames.

Five homes have also been destroyed around Possum Kingdom Lake in North Texas, with the fire burning down at least five other structures.

In North Texas, residents are being asked to conserve water amid drought conditions and the looming heatwave – both of which could pose a potential water shortage.

The North Texas Municipal Water District is calling for customers to reduce their water use ‘immediately,’ especially outdoors, until at least Wednesday.

The water district serves about 2 million people including in Plano and North Dallas County.

It was already forced to cease water production at one of its four treatment plants unexpectedly on Saturday ‘to return the plant back to full water purification capacity,’ according to ABC News reports.

The district claims that maintenance combined with a regional drought prompted the company to request a precautionary reduction in water usage.

It comes just one week after the Electric Reliability Council of Texas had to ask its 26 million customers to voluntarily reduce their electric use in an effort to avoid rolling blackouts as excessive air conditioning use created a strain on the electric grid.

Prisoners in Texas are also battling the brutal heat without air conditioning, with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice warning that some jails do not have working facilities.

Women tried to cool off in the excessive heat wearing bikinis to lay on the grass in Central Park

Women tried to cool off in the excessive heat wearing bikinis to lay on the grass in Central Park

A young boy played in the art installation fountain outside Rockefeller Center as temperatures reached into the 90s on Tuesday

A young boy played in the art installation fountain outside Rockefeller Center as temperatures reached into the 90s on Tuesday

A boy was seen enjoying himself as he played in a water fountain on the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston on the first day of a nationwide heatwave

A boy was seen enjoying himself as he played in a water fountain on the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston on the first day of a nationwide heatwave

Temperatures yesterday reached a scorching 110F, with a spokeswoman for the department adding: ‘There are 100 (Texas Department of Criminal Justice) units, 31 have full AC, 55 have partial AC, and 14 have no AC.

‘We take numerous precautions to lessen the effects of hot temperatures for those incarcerated within our facilities.

‘In 2022, there have been seven inmates who required medical care beyond first aid for heat related injuries, none were fatal.’

Alaska has also experience more than 500 forest fires since the beginning of April, with more than 3m of land burning by mid-July.

As of yesterday there were at least 264 individual fires still burning across the state, with a climate specialist calling it ‘unprecedented.’

Severe thunderstorms and even tornadoes are also a possibility in parts of Canada, according to Environment Canada.

They said in a statement that ‘damaging wind gusts’ will be the main threat adding that a ‘significant tornado’ can’t be ruled out.

NYC advises residents to stay INSIDE and Boston declares emergency as ‘heat dome’ settles Source link NYC advises residents to stay INSIDE and Boston declares emergency as ‘heat dome’ settles

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