Health

Mites found near beaches in northern California warn of Lyme disease

When he moved from New York to the California coast after fighting Lyme disease, Dana Parish thought he was safe from ticks. Now she’s back from the beach and checking for ticks.

“Unfortunately I don’t want you to break it, but that’s exactly what you have to do,” she said.

According to a study published in the Journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology, disease-transmitting mites occur in areas that were long thought to be tick-free. Researchers were surprised to find numerous mites in Chaparral, covering bushes along the beaches of northern California.

Typically, the wooded areas of the northeast are the epicenters of ticks in the United States. Scientists say the ticks exploded this year due to the warm and rainy winters and the large number of rats they feed on. Increasing ticks means increasing tick-borne diseases such as Lime’s disease.

Cases of Lyme disease have been reported in 48 states, and nearly 500,000 Americans are treated for Lyme disease each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Early detection of ticks is important to prevent Lyme disease.

Parish was infected in New Jersey seven years ago. “And within five months of being bitten by a tick, I lost all my parts,” she said.

At some point she fell into heart failure.

“I hope this study brings light to the fact that it’s here,” said Parrish, who said that people going to California’s beaches were more aware of the presence of mites.

Mites found near beaches in northern California warn of Lyme disease

Source link Mites found near beaches in northern California warn of Lyme disease

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