Texas

Meta tells employees NOT to mention abortion on internal chat platforms

Facebook employees were told to stop discussing abortion at work after the issue became “the most divisive and reported issue” in the company’s internal chat system.

Meta executives at Workplace, an online social media platform, accuse abortion debates of putting the organization “at greater risk” of being seen as a “hostile work environment,” The Verge reported.

HR President Janelle Gale told staff at a town hall meeting on Thursday that abortion discussions isolate some workers and are detrimental to the work environment.

“Even if people are respectful, and trying to respect their view of abortion, it can also leave them feeling that people are targeted by their gender or religion,” she said. “It’s almost the only issue that travels in that line in a protected class.”

Executives also argued that discussing abortion on corporate platforms violated Meta’s Respectful Communication Policy, which prohibits employees from “discussing or debating whether abortion is right or wrong, the usefulness or rights of abortion, and political, religious, and humanitarian views.” Gai. ‘

The policy, which has been in place since 2019, has caused division among workers after the Supreme Court’s draft opinions were leaked, with the Court legalizing abortion in the United States in Rove v.

Meta employees were told to stop discussing abortion at work after the issue became the “most divisive and reported topic” on the company’s internal social media platform.

Some Meta staff have called on management to remove the abortion policy, arguing that it violates rules that allow workers to speak “respectfully,” such as the Black Lives Matter, about immigration and transgender rights.

“The policy itself explicitly allows us to discuss similar issues and movements, including immigration, trans-rights, climate change, the Black Lives Matter, gun rights / gun control, and vaccination,” said a woman who worked at Meta for 10 years. by an employee. , caused him to allege politics a “A great sense of silence and isolation in the workplace.”

HR President Janelle Gale told workers at the City Council meeting on Thursday that abortion in the workplace

HR President Janelle Gale told workers at Thursday’s town hall meeting that abortion has become “the most divisive and reported issue” in the workplace and that discussions have isolated some workers.

“I find the argument that our policy treats an issue in a different way than other sensitive issues to be weak and convincing,” he added. “The whole process of tackling a policy of respectful communication, saying why my message is being violated, and working on this new message has felt dehumanizing and dystopian.”

While many employees have expressed frustration at the seemingly double standard of “respectful” content, The Verge reports that some employees have given their support to ban discussions on the issue of division.

The policy, despite being in place for years, seems to have been mismanaged by Meta’s second-in-command, Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, who himself addressed Roe v Wade on his public Facebook page earlier this month.

Sandberg, in a May 3 message, responded to the leaked SCOTUS draft and called abortion “one of our most basic rights.”

“Every woman, wherever she lives, must be free to choose who she will be and when she will be a mother,” she said. “Few things are more important to women’s health and equality.”

Roe v Wade publicly supported the next day as Meta lowered his hammer and began to comply with communication policy.

Meta’s second executive, CEO Sheryl Sandberg, addressed Roe v Wader on her public Facebook page earlier this month.

Meta’s second executive, CEO Sheryl Sandberg, addressed Roe v Wader on her public Facebook page earlier this month.

At work, there are a lot of sensitivities on this subject, which makes it difficult to discuss the Workplace, ”wrote Naomi Gleit in a May 4 internal note from The Verge.

Gleit said staff could only discuss abortion at work “with a trusted colleague in a private setting (e.g., live, chat, etc.)” and “in a listening session to express solidarity with a small group of 5 people with the same idea.” ‘

He encouraged employees to express their opinions on personal social media accounts, but not on job platforms.

Gleit also assured employees that Meta will “continue to provide our employees with access to reproductive health care regardless of whether they live in the United States.”

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Roe v. Wade’s decision to step down has caused a stir in the United States.

Demonstrators gathered in local, state and state government buildings, as well as outside the homes of some SCOTUS judges.

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Roe v. The decision to overthrow Wade has caused a stir as U.S. protesters gather in local, state, and national government buildings, as well as outside the homes of some SCOTUS judges. PHOTO: May 14 abortion concentration in DC

Meanwhile, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Roe v. The decision to overthrow Wade has caused a stir as U.S. protesters gather in local, state, and national government buildings, as well as outside the homes of some SCOTUS judges. PHOTO: May 14 abortion concentration in DC

The federal government is preparing for the rise of political violence when SCOTUS officially decides in June that Roe v. The abortion lawsuit that will invalidate Wade.

A leaked information threat from the Department of Homeland Security on May 13 says it expects to intensify threats against judges, secretaries, lawmakers, clergy and health officials in the coming weeks.

‘DHS is committed to protecting Americans; Freedom of expression and other civil rights and civil rights, including the right to protest peacefully, ‘the agency said in a written response to questions from the statement.

The note warns that “people in a variety of … ideologies are trying to justify and encourage attacks on abortion goals and ideological opponents in various ideologies.”

Twenty-six states will ban abortion in Roe v. If Wade is formally revoked, he is essentially outlawing abortion in more than half of the country. Eighteen states already have restrictive abortion laws in place.

26 states that abortion will be illegal if SCOTUS cancels Roe vs Wade

If the 26 states that would make the abortion illegal SCOTUS annuls Roe vs Wade, after leaking the draft opinions, the majority of judges showed that they supported the move.

If the 26 states that would make the abortion illegal SCOTUS annuls Roe vs Wade, after leaking the draft opinions, the majority of judges showed that they supported the move.

More than half of all U.S. states have some sort of law banning abortion that will come into force if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v Wade.

According to the Guttmacher Institute reproductive rights advocacy group, there are 26 states are likely to make abortions illegal if the Supreme Court overturns the 1973 ruling.

18 have a ban on abortion, previously considered unconstitutional, four have time-barred bans, and four are likely to pass laws if Roe v Wade is repealed, the organization found.

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia have already banned abortion in books. , Wisconsin and Wyoming.

In addition, Georgia, Iowa, Ohio and South Carolina have laws banning abortions after six weeks.

In Florida, Indiana, Montana and Nebraska, Roe v Wade may exceed bills for cancellation, the Guttmacher Institute said.

The bans in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Michigan, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin contain pre-Roe v Wade laws that were impossible for the Supreme Court to enforce after the 1973 ruling; that would put into effect the federal legal precedent. Those established in Roe were overthrown.

Arkansas, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Texas have more bans that will go into effect if the law is repealed. These were surpassed after Roe v Wade.

Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah and Wyoming have joined forces to pass these laws.

The states that will limit abortions depending on how long the patient has been pregnant are Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, North Dakota, and Ohio.

There are four states that have laws that say abortion is not a constitutionally protected right: Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, and West Virginia.

Meta tells employees NOT to mention abortion on internal chat platforms

Source link Meta tells employees NOT to mention abortion on internal chat platforms

Back to top button