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Korean adoption shoots the pain of mother-child separation | Entertainment

In 1982, when Engelstoft arrived in Denmark, more than 6,400 Korean children were sent abroad. Over the last 60 years, a total of about 200,000 Koreans have been adopted abroad, mainly to white parents in the United States and Europe.

Filmed at Jeju’s Aceowon Shelter in 2013 and 2014, Waslenagusa begins with the facility’s director reading a document signed by Engelstoft’s mother. It shows that Engelstoft was abandoned the same day he was born and his mother promised to never look for her.

The paper was stored in an orphanage in Busan, where Engelstoft stayed before the adoption agency Holt Childrens Service matched her with Danish parents.

Engelstoft believes that her mother is one of many women who have been asked by adoption agencies to sign abandonment before the child is born. Holt denied this, saying that Engelstoft was taken from an orphanage rather than his mother.

Despite having known relatives, the child was often abandoned or listed as an orphan.

“I’m very uncomfortable with the adoption parents paying me for the sale and purchase by the adoption agency. I want to reverse that,” Engelstoft said. It was.

The film then follows Aeseowon’s young mother, whose face and voice are hidden for privacy. They do chores, share stories about childbirth pain with their bad boyfriends, pet ultrasound pictures, and giggle through pregnancy photography.

Korean adoption shoots the pain of mother-child separation | Entertainment

Source link Korean adoption shoots the pain of mother-child separation | Entertainment

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