Texas

Kaymie Wuerfel: American expatriates share the biggest culture shock about Australia

An American expatriate lists some of the biggest culture shocks she has experienced since moving to Australia.

Kaymie Wuerfel is acclimatizing to Downunder’s new life after moving from Florida to Sydney in November 2019 with her Australian husband.

In her latest TikTok video, Mrs. Wuerfel questioned Bora’s hairstyle and noticed the difference between women’s tampons.

Scroll down to watch the video

Kaymie Wuerfel (pictured) lists some of the biggest culture shocks she has experienced since moving to Australia.

Mrs. Wuerfel is acclimatizing to Downunder's new life after moving from Florida to Sydney in November 2019 to be with her Australian husband.

Mrs. Wuerfel is acclimatizing to Downunder’s new life after moving from Florida to Sydney in November 2019 to be with her Australian husband.

In a short clip, Mrs. Wuerfel recreates the first time she sees a mullet while roaming Sydney.

Bora is a hairstyle with short bangs and long back hair, which was popular in the 1980s.

After asking someone what they thought about haircuts, Mrs. Wuerfel was surprised and confused by the discovery that Bora was often socially accepted in Australia.

Mrs. Wuerfel said the person commented on Bora and said: Ill Bora, Mate !! “

A short clip recreates when Mrs. Wuerfel first saw Bora while roaming Sydney.

Mullet is a hairstyle with short front and long back.

A short clip recreates when Mrs. Wuerfel first saw Bora while roaming Sydney.

After asking someone what they thought about haircuts, Mrs. Wuerfel was surprised and confused and discovered that Bora was socially accepted in Australia.

Mrs. Wuerfel said the person commented on Bora and said: Ill Bora, Mate !!

After asking someone what they thought about haircuts, Mrs. Wuerfel was surprised and confused and discovered that Bora was socially accepted in Australia.

At work, Mrs. Wuerfel asked her colleague if she had a tampon, but was surprised at the design.

“Hey, do you have tampons?” And she said: “Yes.” Then I asked: “What is this? What’s wrong?”

American tampons come with an applicator, but most Australian brands do not.

At work, Mrs. Wuerfel asked her colleague if she had a tampon, but was surprised at the design.

American tampons come with an applicator, but most Australian brands do not.

American tampons come with an applicator, but most Australian brands don’t.

In comments, other expatriates said they had experienced this turmoil with regard to Bora and tampons.

‘Okay! I’m from Canada living in Australia, and I can’t get over how many mullets are here! “

“Bora should go back to the 80’s,” said one Australian.

‘In Australia you can get [tampons] Many women, with or without applicators, are small and carry around without them, “confirmed the third person.

This video is part of a series of TikTok clips shared online by Mrs. Wuerfel.

Revealed: Australian Culture Shock

-Free health care

-Greeting people using C-word

-Chicken salt

-No tips for waiters / waitresses

-Pay 15 cents for a grocery bag

-Retail price includes tax

-Bora

-tampon

Earlier this year, she revealed other culture shocks she had experienced since moving to Downunder.

The young brunette said at the grocery store with her husband that she had noticed that all the prices displayed on the shelves were already “marked to include taxes.”

She said the conversation happened when she asked him to give her $ 5 and taxes so that she could pay for the peanut butter tub.

‘But he told me All prices in Australia are marked to include taxes … I understand how easy it is to buy things at the marked prices, “she explained.

After eating at a “nice” restaurant, Mrs. Wuerfel said she asked her husband if he had cash to tip.

“He told me you wouldn’t leave a hint in Australia. Did I ask how the waiter survived? He said the minimum wage was about $ 20,” she recalled. ..

“I acted so that it wasn’t the most amazing thing I’ve ever heard.”

When her husband was injured, he told her he needed to go to the hospital, where she was afraid: “We’re going to spend our life savings on hospital bills. . “

One of the things that

When ordering french fries, she was scratching her head when the waitress asked if she wanted chicken salt, one of Australia's classic seasonings commonly used for hot chips seasonings. ..

One of the things that “shocked” her about the country was that she faced a “random Australian” using the C word in conversation. When ordering french fries, she was scratching her head when the waitress asked if she wanted chicken salt.

But she later said she reassured her that Medicare covered “everything,” while Mrs. Wuerfel was “believed” to hear about this “incredible information.” No, “he explained.

One of the things that “shocked” her about the country Faced with a “random Australian” using the C word in a conversation.

While walking, Mrs. Wuerfel casually asked people “Yes, Ill c ***”, “oi c ***”, “Hey c ***”, or “What’s wrong with c ***?” He said he witnessed what he was saying.

When ordering french fries, she was scratching her head when the waitress asked if she wanted chicken salt, one of Australia’s classic seasonings commonly used for hot chip seasonings. ..

But she confirmed that she said “yes” every time the chicken salt was served.

When she first visited the supermarket, Mrs. Wuerfel said she was surprised when a checkout employee wanted to charge 15 cents for a grocery bag.

When she first visited the supermarket, Mrs. Wuerfel said she was surprised when a checkout employee wanted to charge 15 cents for a grocery bag.

When she first visited the supermarket, Mrs. Wuerfel said she was surprised when a checkout employee wanted to charge 15 cents for a grocery bag.

When she first visited the supermarket, Mrs. Wuerfel said she was surprised when a checkout employee wanted to charge 15 cents for a grocery bag.

“She asked:” Do you want a bag? “And I was:” Of course, I want a bag. “Then she goes:” Well, it’s per bag. It ’s 15 cents. ”Is it 15 cents per bag? She remembered.

Major Australian supermarkets charge customers for reusable bags to crack down on disposable plastic bags.

Since then, her two videos have been watched almost a million times, and many agree with most of her claims.

“As an Australian waitress, I can confirm that the money is pretty good, but some people still tip, which is very nice because it means they loved your service,” wrote one person. I am.

“The answer is always in favor of chicken salt,” another said. “When the United States learned that the list price did not include taxes, I almost cried thinking about how much math I had to do.”

Kaymie Wuerfel: American expatriates share the biggest culture shock about Australia

Source link Kaymie Wuerfel: American expatriates share the biggest culture shock about Australia

Back to top button