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Judge Breyer will retire from the Supreme Court on Thursday

Supreme Court Judge Stephen Breyer has informed President Joe Biden that he will officially retire from the bench on Thursday, ending a nearly 30-year career in the country’s highest court.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, Breyer’s former secretary, will take office the same day, the high court announced Wednesday.


What You Need to Know

  • Supreme Court Judge Stephen Breyer will officially retire from the bench on Thursday, ending a nearly 30-year career.
  • Breyer’s retirement will officially take effect at noon on Thursday, hours after the court issued its remaining opinions for the term.
  • She will be replaced by Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who will be the first black woman and the first former federal public defender to serve on the country’s highest court.
  • Judge Jackson, Breyer’s former secretary, will take the oath on Thursday, the high court announced Wednesday.

“It has been my great honor to participate as a judge in the effort to uphold our Constitution and the rule of law,” Breyer wrote in a letter to President Biden.

Breyer’s retirement will officially take effect at noon on Thursday, hours after the court issued its remaining opinions for the term.

Breyer announced in January that he would retire from the high court at the end of his current term.

Jackson, who was confirmed by the Senate in April, will be the first black woman and the first former federal public defender to serve in the country’s highest court.

During Thursday’s inauguration ceremony, Chief Justice John Roberts will administer the constitutional oath, while Breyer will administer the judicial oath. A small meeting of Jackson’s family will be present, according to the high court.

Breyer, 83, is the oldest high court judge and has been a key member of his liberal wing for years. Breyer was first appointed to the Supreme Court in 1994 by then-President Bill Clinton; Biden, then a U.S. senator, presided over his confirmation hearings as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“I greatly appreciate the privilege of serving as part of the federal judicial system,” he wrote at the time in a letter to President Biden. “It seemed like a challenging and meaningful job. My relationships with each of my colleagues were warm and friendly.”

Breyer faced calls for withdrawal by several progressive members of the Democratic Party, especially following Biden’s predecessor Donald Trump appointed three Conservative judges to the bank, including Judicial Amy Coney Barrett to replace Liberal Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg a few weeks before the 2020 election.

It leaves a much more conservative court than the one that came in, after a tumultuous term full of several high-profile cases, including recent rulings that overturned Roe against Wadeextending the protections of the Second Amendment and those in favor of religious plaintiffs.

This is a developing story. Come back later for more updates.

Judge Breyer will retire from the Supreme Court on Thursday

Source link Judge Breyer will retire from the Supreme Court on Thursday

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