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In R. Kelly’s verdict, black women see long-deferred justice | National News

Music writer Jim DeRogatis couldn’t understand it. He and his colleagues first reported on R. Kelly’s interaction with the girl in December 2000, and Delogatis continued to write about it for years to come.

Whenever something came out like the video, Delogatis thought it had to be — it had to make a difference in the end. And every time it wasn’t.

It brought awareness to Derogatis, a middle-aged white man. It is unfair that “no one in our society is as important as a young black girl.”

And he said the girls and women he interviewed knew it. The first thing he heard from the dozens he interviewed was, “Who believes us? We are black girls.”

So R. Kelly made hits for years on end, co-starred with other artists, and sometimes called himself “Pide Piper,” but professed not to know the story of the musician who kidnapped the children in the town.

Those who came after weeks of disturbing testimony and welcomed Monday’s conviction that Kelly could spend decades in prison, the strength and patience of black women, which was a particularly recent driving force. For years, it remains to him to oppose and demand attention.

In R. Kelly’s verdict, black women see long-deferred justice | National News

Source link In R. Kelly’s verdict, black women see long-deferred justice | National News

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