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Images of the deep universe, courtesy of NASA’s James Webb Telescope, will soon be released to the public

Late the previous year, NASA spear the James Webb Space Telescope, mankind’s largest and most powerful telescope, to answer questions about the origins of the universe. Six months have passed since then, and now the first images of the next-generation telescope are about to be released.

Come next month, get ready to see what NASA Administrator Bill Nelson has said is the deepest image of the universe ever taken by mankind to date. Wait two weeks and we will have access to the first high-resolution color images of the telescope.

NASA, along with the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency, will unveil the images at an event on July 12 (so mark the data on your calendars). For those who can’t, like you and me, NASA has decided to broadcast the output live, along with the first spectrum of an exoplanet from the telescope (which will offer new information about the atmospheres and chemical compositions of planets). other exoplanets.

“If you think about it, it’s further than humanity has ever gone before,” said Nelson, who tested positive for COVID-19. “And we’re only beginning to understand what Webb can and will do. It will explore solar system objects and the atmospheres of exoplanets orbiting other stars, giving us clues as to whether their atmospheres are potentially similar to ours.

“It’s not a picture. It’s a new view of the world,” Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, said Wednesday, describing the moment the first images are seen as nature “letting go of secrets that have been there for a long time. many, many decades, centuries, millennia”.

Undoubtedly, seeing the images will be a historic moment for mankind, and will mark a new chapter in mankind’s conquest of space. The James Webb Space Telescope, which has enough fuel to operate for 20 years, has now reached a vantage point more than a million miles from Earth and has successfully deployed its expansive sunshade.

“Not only will these 20 years allow us to delve deeper into history and time, but we will delve deeper into science because we will have the opportunity to learn, grow and make new observations,” said Pam Melroy, administrator. NASA assistant.

He is currently taking the photos, which will include the life cycle of stars (from birth to death), how galaxies interact and grow, and how collisions between galaxies lead to star formation. It will continue to send data and images to the blue planet in the lead up to the July 12 event.

In the long term, the James Webb Space Telescope will also seek to complete its mission and see the first stars and galaxies in the universe, as well as peer into exoplanets to determine if there is life on other planets. after all.

Images of the deep universe, courtesy of NASA’s James Webb Telescope, will soon be released to the public

Source link Images of the deep universe, courtesy of NASA’s James Webb Telescope, will soon be released to the public

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