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Harvard has the remains of nearly 7,000 Native Americans and black slaves in the museum’s collection

A leaked report revealed that Harvard University has the remains of nearly 7,000 Native Americans and about 20 slaves.

The draft was compiled by a committee last year to examine how the university has managed its ties to the American slavery legacy.

The university announced in April that it would provide $ 100 million for an endowment fund and other measures to close the educational, social and economic gaps that are the legacy of slavery and racism.

The draft “unfinished” report was leaked this week by The Harvard Crimson.

Evelynn M. Hammonds, chairman of the committee, expressed disappointment at the leak. Hammonds called the professor of African American studies and a former dean of Harvard College “irresponsible.”

A leaked report revealed that Harvard University has the remains of nearly 7,000 Native Americans and about 20 slaves, many of whom are housed in the Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology (pictured).

The rest of the DNA is in the Warren University Anatomical Museum

The rest of the DNA is in the Warren University Anatomical Museum

He also mentioned the document he took out “an outdated version that does not reflect weeks of additional information and committee work”.

Evelynn M. Hammonds, chairman of the committee, expressed disappointment at the leak. Professor of African American Studies and former dean of Harvard College

Evelynn M. Hammonds, chairman of the committee, expressed disappointment at the leak. Hammonds called African American studies professor and former dean of Harvard College “irresponsible”

Hammonds says the latest report will include DNA analysis, exposure and ethical care and more detailed proposals for human remains to find out what to do with the remains.

Harvard President Lawrence S. Bacow said in 2021 that when he founded the committee, the school’s Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology and the Warren Anatomical Museum housed the remains of more than 22,000 people.

“We know a lot about some of these people because there were accurate records of their special experiences, but they didn’t provide any biographical information to others,” Bacow said in an hourly note.

“The latter circumstance depends, in some cases, on the condition of individuals at the time of death or on the standards for collecting their remains.”

Dr. Henry Louis Gates - the host and outstanding academic of Finding Your Roots - is a member of the committee.

Dr. Henry Louis Gates – the host and outstanding academic of Finding Your Roots – is a member of the committee.

Professor Jane Pickering is another member of the 16-person committee to determine what to do with the remains.

Professor Jane Pickering is another member of the 16-person committee to determine what to do with the remains.

The committee was formed after a review by the Peabody Museum after protests claimed that the organizations had failed to comply with legal requirements to catalog their artifacts and remains.

It includes some well-known academies, including Henry Louis Gates Jr., Philip J. Deloria, and Randall L. Kennedy.

All museums need to do this Native American Burial Protection and Repatriation Act.

The commission, as part of the draft report, should consult the ‘descendants’ of the remains of what to actually do with them, even if not necessarily the money for the repairs.

Descendants were defined as literal family members or indigenous peoples or enslaved communities.

“The best result of the original research would be the identification of the following lineages, but if this is not possible, the research should aim to verify descendants or groups of direct ties to the individual.

The remains could be transferred directly to descendants, buried at a suitable event, or donated to these communities.

A $ 100 million “repair” fund suggested the April report included a history of slaves working on campus and the beneficiaries of the university’s slave trade and slave-related industries after Massachusetts outlawed slavery in 1783 – 147 years after its founding at Harvard. .

The report also documents the exclusion of Harvard black students and scholars who advocate racism.

Harvard University is allocating $ 100 million for an endowment fund and other measures to close the educational, social and economic gaps that are the heritage of slavery and racism, the university president said (photo)

Harvard University is allocating $ 100 million for an endowment fund and other measures to close the educational, social and economic gaps that are the heritage of slavery and racism, the university president said (photo)

Bacow (pictured) said in April that a committee would consider turning the recommendations into action and that a university governing board had authorized $ 100 million to implement them, with some of the funds stored in an endowment.

Bacow (pictured) said in April that a committee would consider turning the recommendations into action and that a university governing board had authorized $ 100 million to implement them, with some of the funds stored in an endowment.

Although Harvard had significant figures among abolitionists and the civil rights movement, the report states that “the nation’s oldest higher education institution … helped to perpetuate the racial oppression and exploitation of the time.”

The authors of the report recommend providing education and other support to the descendants of Harvard enslaved people, “reclaiming their stories, telling their stories, and gaining empowering knowledge.”

Other recommendations include funding Ivy League schools for summer programs, bringing students and faculty from long-funded black universities and historic universities to Harvard, and sending Harvard students and faculty to organizations known as HBCUs, such as Howard University.

In his email, Harvard chairman Bacow said a committee would consider turning the recommendations into action and that a university governing body had authorized $ 100 million to implement them, with some of the funds stored in an endowment.

Harvard has the remains of nearly 7,000 Native Americans and black slaves in the museum’s collection

Source link Harvard has the remains of nearly 7,000 Native Americans and black slaves in the museum’s collection

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