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Governor of Mississippi says advances in science have boosted the chances of an abortion ban succeeding at SCOTUS

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Mississippi Governor Tate Reeves claims that advances in scientific knowledge have boosted the proceedings against abortion since the Roe v. Wade case was decided, giving the state a definite chance of a successful abortion ban in the Supreme Court. I believe there is.

“I think science has changed,” he told Fox News in an exclusive interview on Tuesday. “What we know about a 15-week-old child is: We know that the child has a heartbeat. We know that the child pumps a few quarts of blood every day. We know that the baby has a developing lung. The baby can squeeze his hands and fingers, and we know that the baby can feel pain. “

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His comments came on the eve of the Supreme Court, where he heard oral arguments about Dobbs vs. Jackson women’s health. This includes a 15-week abortion ban challenge in his state.

“I believe science has changed.”

— Mississippi Governor Tate Rivers

Governor of Mississippi, Tate Rivers, will speak at the Governor’s residence in Jackson, Mississippi, on June 30, 2020. (Getty Images)

Reeves’ comments reflect the long-standing debate on the right. In short, advances in science have revealed important insights into life in the womb.

“Nearly 50 years of scientific progress have literally revealed the humanity of the fetal,” said Dr. Tara Thunder Lee of the Charlotte Roger Institute, which opposes abortion.

“Nearly 50 years of scientific progress have literally revealed the humanity of the foetation.”

— Dr. Tara Thunder Lee of Charlotte Roger Institute

Dr. Tara Thunder Lee (CSPAN)

Dr. Tara Thunder Lee (CSPAN)

She told Fox News on Tuesday, before Rho, “The foetation was barely visible in the womb on a grainy black-and-white ultrasound image, but now the uncovered science can’t make the foetation feel pain. After Rho, the advancement of fetal ultrasound evolved rapidly. It paved the way for a clear view of the fetal, more accurately diagnosed fetal malformations, and surgically diagnosed some conditions in the womb. It can be repaired. “

The Mississippi case is based on the idea that existing evidence gives the state sufficient justification to protect the life of a woman’s fetal 15 weeks gestation. Earlier court rulings protected prior to access to abortion or before the foetation was able to survive on its own. The time limit is constantly retreating, and recently a baby in Alabama was born in 19 weeks. This is just before the 20-week deadline proposed and rejected by the Senate in 2018.

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Proponents and anti-abortion demonstrators will meet outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, November 1, 2021.

Proponents and anti-abortion demonstrators will meet outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, November 1, 2021.
(Getty Images)

The state of Reeves has virtually ignored the previous ruling and is asking the court to give the state room to set certain restrictions on abortion. Meanwhile, lawyers at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization argue that there is no reason for the court to abolish decades of case law.

Fetal pain was discussed

The debate about fetal pain is particularly controversial, as science is still evolving on that topic.

Critics like Dr. Jenganta claim that the foetation cannot feel pain until about 28-29 weeks.

“Thalamic cortical fibers, thalamic-to-cortical connections in the brain, start [emphasis hers] The gestational age will be about 23 weeks. ”

American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology Insisted “Pain perception requires more than mechanical transmission and reception of signals.”

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But Lee says recent studies have revealed more about pain.

“Modern pain studies have replaced old myths with the scientific fact that the foetation feels pain, perhaps as early as 12 weeks,” Lee said. “Currently, analgesics are routinely used in endometrial fetal surgery. Eggs need to be thrown away. Obsolete and outdated and need to be replaced by modern legislation that reflects today’s science rather than 50 years ago. I have.”

“Eggs need to be thrown away. It’s outdated and outdated and needs to be replaced by modern law that reflects today’s science rather than 50 years ago.”

— Dr. Tara Thunder Lee of Charlotte Roger Institute

She pointed to a work by Dr. Stuart Derbyshire, who previously dismissed “fetal pain” as a “misnomer.” In 2020, he co-authored a dissertation suggesting that the general consensus (pain at 24 weeks) may be wrong.

“”[T]His evidence and a balanced reading of that evidence show an experience of immediate reflex pain mediated by the development of nervous system function as early as 12 weeks, “the paper read.

Will the battle intensify?

If Mississippi succeeds, the political battle for abortion can intensify as the state vie for certain laws banning procedures.

Police officers continue to monitor outside the Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC on November 3, 2021.

Police officers continue to monitor outside the Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC on November 3, 2021.
(Getty Images)

The Democratic Party of the House of Representatives is already anticipating a more conservative decision by passing a women’s health protection law aimed at codifying Roe in federal law.

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Anyway, Reeves told Fox News:

“Every opportunity to reduce or limit the number of abortions is a victory for the pro-life movement,” he added.

Governor of Mississippi says advances in science have boosted the chances of an abortion ban succeeding at SCOTUS

Source link Governor of Mississippi says advances in science have boosted the chances of an abortion ban succeeding at SCOTUS

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