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Almost three-quarters of U.S. children infected with Covid do not develop the symptoms of concern

A new study suggests that the majority of children infected with COVID-19 do not show the typical symptoms of the disease.

Researchers who examined more than 12,300 people under the age of 18 found that nearly 75% of those who tested positive did not experience fever, cough, or shortness of breath.

Only about 5% of children were hospitalized, but they were up to five times more likely to report fever, nausea, vomiting, and even a rash.

In addition, a team at the University of Alabama at Birmingham found that infants infected with the virus were almost three times more likely to get sick than tweens and teenagers.

However, on Wednesday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Board extended the eligibility of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine between the ages of 12 and 15.

Researchers examined more than 12,300 children under the age of 18 who tested positive for COVID-19 and found that 75% had no symptoms, but hospitalized children were more likely to have symptoms. Did.

Taste and olfactory loss rates were common in both groups, but only about 15% of non-hospitalized children had a fever compared to 40.7% of hospitalized children-2.7 times the rate of taste loss.

Taste and olfactory loss rates were common in both groups, but only about 15% of non-hospitalized children had a fever compared to 40.7% of hospitalized children-2.7 times the rate of taste loss.

Children who were not hospitalized and those who were hospitalized were about as likely to have headaches, but the rate of nausea and vomiting was about five times more common in hospitalized patients.

Children who were not hospitalized and those who were hospitalized were about as likely to have headaches, but the rate of nausea and vomiting was about five times more common in hospitalized patients.

In this study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team examined data on 12,306 children who tested positive for the coronavirus.

Children between the ages of 0 and 18 were seen by doctors at 33 medical institutions across the United States.

Researchers examined children with the prevalence of fever, cough, and shortness of breath, which are typical symptoms of COVID-19.

They found that the majority of children, 74.9 percent, had none of the classic symptoms. Only about 25.1 percent of children had one of the three, and 9.9 percent had at least two.

The most common symptoms are non-specific symptoms such as fever, muscle aches, and loss of taste and smell, experienced by 18.8%.

About 16.5% showed respiratory symptoms such as cough, and 13.9% showed gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

Less common signs were skin symptoms such as a rash in 8.1% and neurological symptoms such as headache in 4.8%.

In total, 672 or 5.5 of patients. Percent was hospitalized with COVID-19.

For common symptoms such as muscle aches, malaise, and loss of taste and smell, the incidence was the same between hospitalized and non-hospitalized children.

The only recognizable difference was fever rate, which was found in 15% of non-hospitalized patients and 40.7% of hospitalized patients.

Similar proportions of non-hospitalized and hospitalized children had cough and headache symptoms.

Fever and rash were much more common among infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with COVID-19 compared to adolescents, but the rate of cough was similar for all age groups.

Fever and rash were much more common among infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with COVID-19 compared to adolescents, but the rate of cough was similar for all age groups.

However, shortness of breath was slightly higher in hospitalized children, compared to 10% in non-hospitalized children, compared to 12%.

In addition, pediatric patients in hospitals were 4-5 times more likely to experience nausea and vomiting.

In addition, less than 1% of non-hospitalized patients showed skin symptoms such as rash and conjunctivitis, compared to more than 6% of hospitalized patients.

The team examined symptoms across age groups and found similar rates of cough, nausea, and vomiting at all ages.

However, infants, toddlers, and preschoolers were much more likely to experience fever and rash than elementary and adolescents, up to 2.7 times more likely.

Researchers also examined differences in hospitalization rates for white, black, and Hispanic children.

Black and Hispanic children were more likely to be hospitalized with Covid, compared to 3.3% for white children, 6.5% and 4.6%, respectively.

Of all hospitalized children, 118 (17.6%) needed critical care services and 38 (4.1%) needed mechanical ventilation.

The risk of requiring both critical care and mechanical ventilation was similar in all groups.

“The findings suggest that children and adolescents with COVID-19 may have a milder illness than adults,” the author writes.

“Given the high frequency of typical asymptomatic cases, increased vigilance, innovative screening, and frequent contact between school children and their direct contact when school resumes. Inspection may be required.

On Wednesday, the CDC Advisory Board recommended that Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine be given to children aged 12 to 15 years.Photo: A teenager receives a shot in a clinical trial of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine

On Wednesday, the CDC Advisory Board recommended that Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine be given to children aged 12 to 15 years.Photo: A teenager receives a shot in a clinical trial of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine

The study will take place the day after the CDC Advisory Board recommends that Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine be given to children aged 12 to 15 years on Wednesday.

In total, 14 members of the Advisory Committee on Immunization and Implementation (ACIP) voted “yes” and one member rejected himself and gave a shot to a young teenager.

The vaccine was approved by Americans over the age of 16 in December 2020, and Pfizer has been testing teens since October last year.

Formal recommendations from ACIP and an emergency use authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) given on Monday pave the way for most states to begin distributing shots to youth on Thursday.

Increased eligibility means that more than 17 million Americans can be vaccinated. This is seen by some health professionals as a step towards reaching herd immunity.

However, parents and health experts are discussing whether to vaccinate children, who account for only 0.1% of COVID deaths.

Almost three-quarters of U.S. children infected with Covid do not develop the symptoms of concern

Source link Almost three-quarters of U.S. children infected with Covid do not develop the symptoms of concern

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