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According to the CDC, girls’ suicide attempts surged by more than 50% during the pandemic.

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Suicide attempts surged during the Covid-19 pandemic, especially among adolescent girls, with longer social distance orders and government blockades, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It got worse as it continued.

In a study published Friday, the CDC said emergency department visits to adolescent hospitals had already increased in early May 2020, when the pandemic was widespread throughout the United States. From late July to late August 2020, the average number of weekly visits to the emergency department for girls aged 12 to 17 on suspicion of attempted suicide increased by 26.2% over the same period last year.

According to the CDC, the blockade of pandemics and the disruption of daily life due to social distance orders may have contributed to the increase in suicide attempts. In the spring of 2020, the number of male and female emergency outpatient visits between the ages of 18 and 24 decreased by 16.8% compared to the same period of the previous year.

If you or anyone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Hotline at 800-273-8255.

By June 2020, 25% of adults surveyed in the same age group reported having experienced pandemic-related suicidal ideation in the last 30 days, consistent with 2019, according to the CDC.

For adolescent girls, the average weekly visits to emergency departments suspected of suicide attempt from February 2021 to March 2021 increased by 50.6% over the same period last year.

According to the CDC, emergency department visits suspected of attempted suicide include attempted suicide visits and self-harm without suicide.

Data were collected by the CDC from emergency department visit data from the 49 State National Syndrome Surveillance Program. Not all states have consistent emergency department visit data, and racial and ethnic data were not available at the time of the study.

Suicide attempts are often higher in girls than in boys, but because of the pandemic, the difference was more pronounced in this study than in previous studies. The study points to an increase in visits to emergency departments suspected of attempting suicide, rather than an increase in actual suicide, the CDC emphasized in the study.

Increased suspicion of suicide attempts in adolescents may be due to social distance, such as lack of connections with schools, teachers and friends. Other factors may include barriers to mental health treatment, increased substance abuse, and anxiety about family health and financial status at home.

The average visit rate for emergency departments with mental health concerns and suspected child abuse will also increase in 2020 compared to 2019, which may contribute to an increase in suspicion of suicide attempt.

Studies show that more time a child stays at home may help parents warn of their child’s mental health problems and seek emergency treatment.

The study also noted that the data probably underestimated the actual number of suspicious suicide attempts, as Americans hesitated to go to the hospital during the pandemic for fear of being infected with Covid-19. Did.

According to the CDC, girls’ suicide attempts surged by more than 50% during the pandemic.

Source link According to the CDC, girls’ suicide attempts surged by more than 50% during the pandemic.

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