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A compelling new series says that it was a darker side for Mother Teresa

He was able to stop wars, reconcile with presidents, build a global orphanage empire, and get sick prisoners out of prison. However, Mother Teresa covered up the worst abuses of the Catholic Church and seemed more attracted to poverty and pain than to helping people flee.

That’s what Mother Teresa: For The Love Of God is all about in an engaging three-part Sky documentary series that speaks to her bitter friends and bitter critics and serves as an in-depth review of one of the most famous women of the last century. .

Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was born in Skopje (now Northern Macedonia) in 1910. Mother Teresa’s father died at the age of eight, plunging her family into poverty. She calmed down in church and, at the age of 12, decided to become a nun.

At the age of 18 he moved to Dublin to join the Catholic Sisters of Loreto, and a year later moved to Calcutta, now Kolkata, to become a teacher. Witnessing the misery and death caused by the famine in Bengal in 1943 – when the eleven dead bodies lay on the street – had a profound effect on him, and three years later Jesus said that he had spoken on a train, giving new instructions. .

Mother Teresa in 1979. Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu was born in Skopje (now Northern Macedonia) in 1910. Mother Teresa’s father died at the age of eight, plunging her family into poverty. She calmed down in church and, at the age of 12, decided to become a nun

“I would leave the convent and help the poor,” he later wrote. “It was an order. To fail would be to break the faith. ”

The church gave him permission to begin his order, the Missionary of Charity, and he chose a new custom; a simple white cotton award with a blue edge. From the very beginning, their compassion and charm were twinned with an unbearable steel.

Navin Chawla, an official who became a close friend, witnessed a lieutenant governor of the region ask him for some land to care for people with leprosy. The governor reduced it to a tear and gave him more than double the amount of land he had hoped for.

“He was the villain of a farmer,” Navin recalls. “He was very focused, a little stubborn. I just fell in love. ”

The word began to spread, and in 1969 a group of BBC documentaries began research. “I didn’t know I had to be sick or cry,” recalls Peter Chafer, the day he took them on their missions.

“The experience in those places was almost too much to bear. Here is what this nun took that most people would have avoided.

Mother Teresa as a young girl (left) with her older sister Aga. At the age of 18 he moved to Dublin to join the Catholic Sisters of Loreto, and a year later moved to Calcutta, now Kolkata, to become a teacher.

Mother Teresa as a young girl (left) with her older sister Aga. At the age of 18 he moved to Dublin to join the Catholic Sisters of Loreto, and a year later moved to Calcutta, now Kolkata, to become a teacher.

“She was a pretty great woman. I thought, “Let’s try to put it on the map.” When the documentary came out, they all went crazy. ”

He became famous overnight, made money, and in 1979 won the Nobel Peace Prize. But was everything as it seemed?

The series shows that the British doctor Jack Preger worked with his charity from the beginning, and he was amazed at what he saw. “The nuns didn’t pay proper attention,” he says.

“The needles were used repeatedly without sterilization. A woman with burns was denied medical pain. I smuggled some into it.

His nuns had to flog themselves, wear chained chains … he believed that suffering redeemed the world

“They have the money to run a decent hospital for the poor, but they never did. They said, “We will pray for pain relief without treatment.”

Pain was not only a by-product of his work, but a part of it. Mojai ordered them to wear themselves with whips and wire chains.

Mary Johnson, who worked with Mother Teresa for 20 years, says: “Her spirituality on the cross was connected with Jesus.

“He spent his life in pain and believed that giving himself up with suffering was the greatest value. The idea was that suffering would redeem the world. ”

In the 1980s his profile was never higher. In 1982 he called for a ceasefire in Beirut to save some orphans, and it came as a surprise.

Three years later, he released a prisoner who died of AIDS in a New York City prison. By then, £ 100 million a year was coming into his organization, but most of it was being paid for by the Vatican bank.

Pain was not only a by-product of his work, but a part of it. Mojai ordered them to wear themselves with whips and wire chains

Pain was not only a by-product of his work, but a part of it. The Mojai ordered them to wear whips and wire chains

“He thought it was good to be poor because Jesus was poor. It’s schizophrenic, “says Mary Johnson.

The last decade of Mother Teresa’s life was perhaps the most difficult.

He was struggling with old age, but the church was calling on him to save the priests from the growing scandal of child abuse.

“They would send the scandals to the villages where they were being lit,” says Maryk. “It could change the story.”

How much did he know? It’s impossible to say, but, as the show revealed, when Rev. Donald McGuire was suspected of abuse, he wrote a letter to authorities emphasizing his “trust and confidence” in him.

He released hundreds of boys for another decade of abuse.

His involvement in the scandal was silenced, but his legacy was tainted. Was he a saint or a sinner … or a little of both?

  • Mother Teresa: For The Love Of God, Monday, 9 p.m., Sky Documentaries.

A compelling new series says that it was a darker side for Mother Teresa

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