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10 restaurants that changed American eating habits | Voice of America

According to Paul Friedman, a professor of history at Yale University, Delmonico’s, the first restaurant in the United States, is also one of the most influential restaurants.

“It defined what elegant food was in the United States in the 19th century, and to some extent it influenced the foods eaten today,” says Friedman.

Founded in 1830, Delmonico’s invented Lobster Newberg, created Baked Alaska, and continues to serve these and other dishes in New York City.

“The first successful restaurant in the United States … Delmonico’s is the first restaurant, so it’s easy, but it’s also very durable,” says Friedman. “Created in the 1830s, but still considered the best restaurant in the United States in 1890. Many restaurants claim to be self-proclaimed elsewhere, such as the Delmonicos of India Napolis, an abbreviation for Fancy. It has become. ”

Delmonicos Restaurant in New York City with no date photos. (Courtesy: Delmonico’s)

In his book, The Ten Restaurants That Changed America, Friedman lists nine other restaurants that have had a widespread influence on what Americans eat.

Professor Paul Friedman, Yale University, Author "10 restaurants that changed America." (Courtesy: Yale University)
Professor Paul Friedman of Yale University, author of “10 Restaurants That Changed America”. (Courtesy: Yale University)

“I chose both to enjoy the restaurant as a place, but also as a way to talk about American history,” he says. “Because we can’t talk about restaurants without talking about ethnicity, immigration, diversity, and different social situations …. So this isn’t as a kind of culinary history, but as the history of American society as seen through the restaurant. It was intended. ”

Howard Johnson, an orange-roofed restaurant that once scattered on American highways, is on the list.

“It was roadside food. It was chain food. It pioneered the franchise as a way of expansion, where you give stakes to those who are running it,” says Friedman. “He also pioneered the logo and identity. Founder Howard Deering Johnson strategically puts the restaurant on the road where a 60-year-old driver can safely and easily destroy and pull up the restaurant in time. I’ve placed it. To do that, I need a big, ready-to-recognize feature. ”

In this April 8, 2015 photo, a customer is stepping into Howard Johnson's Restaurant in Lake George, NY.
In this April 8, 2015 photo, a customer is stepping into Howard Johnson’s Restaurant in Lake George, NY.

Howard Johnson did not survive the competition it created, like McDonald’s and other fast-food restaurants, but as the first restaurant chain to guarantee the same food and menu to its patrons no matter which franchise they visit. I left the position.

The list also includes Mandarin, a Chinese restaurant opened in San Francisco by Cecilia Cheung in 1961.

“Cecilia Cheung didn’t invent fine Chinese food, but most of it,” says Friedman. “She really was the first person to retail it well.”

Sylvia's staff in Harlem in 1980. (Carroll M. Highsmith, Library of Congress)
Sylvia’s staff in Harlem in 1980. (Carroll M. Highsmith, Library of Congress)

Another woman-owned restaurant that highlights Friedman is Sylvia’s in Harlem. Born in South Carolina, Silvia Woods brought Southern cuisine and the idea of ​​a neighborhood restaurant as a community gathering place to New York.

“Sylvia’s in Harlem did not invent what is sometimes called home-cooked food or soul food, but it is an example of such food, and also an example of the story of African-American migration from the south to the north. There is, “says Friedman.

Mamma Leone’s, also in New York, helped bring Italian food to the American masses. Luisa Leone opened a restaurant in 1906, allowing it to expand its customers beyond the Italian-American diet and create a model for other immigrant business owners to follow.

“Mamma Leone not only serves about 3,000 people a day, but many are tourists, so many people understand what Italian food should be,” Friedman said. say. “And many people opened restaurants in a small town that imitated Mamma Leone.”

Menu of the restaurant of Mamma Leone in New York City, which closed in 1994. (Courtesy: New York Public Library)
Menu of the restaurant of Mamma Leone in New York City, which closed in 1994. (Courtesy: New York Public Library)

Alice Waters opened Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California in 1971. She pioneered the trend of American cuisine using local seasonal ingredients that continues today.

These female restaurant owners offered very different dishes, but shared some attributes.

“Flare. Inventive. It’s not completely unfamiliar, but it’s familiar, but it’s doing better,” says Friedman. “It’s better than our competitors, and it’s about quality, introducing food that broadens people’s horizons, or reminding people of their home.”

Waiter Austin Murray will bring plated food from the kitchen to the dining room of Antoine's Restaurant in New Orleans on September 11, 2015.
Waiter Austin Murray will bring plated food from the kitchen to the dining room of Antoine’s Restaurant in New Orleans on September 11, 2015.

Other restaurants on Friedman’s list include New York’s Four Seasons (opened in 1959 and pioneered fine American cuisine when French cuisine dominated the space), New York’s Le Pavilion, and Antoine’s Restaurant in New Orleans. Z, Schruffft Boston.

Most of Friedman’s recommendations are on the east or west coast.

“I think it has to do with New York and San Francisco being ports, so the first place immigrants opened restaurants, and also fashion leaders,” he says. “That is, all these places, including New Orleans, are on the coast, where immigrants came from, and where new things were first tried in multiple languages.”

The six restaurants on Friedman’s list are still open and are planned to reopen in the case of Four Seasons. Others are closed, but their influence on what Americans eat has endured.

10 restaurants that changed American eating habits | Voice of America

Source link 10 restaurants that changed American eating habits | Voice of America

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